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Export an Access Database to SQL mdf file

Posted on 2015-02-10
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Last Modified: 2016-02-11
I want to export an Access database that I created to a SQL database with an mdf extension. How do I do that in Access 2010? Eventually, I want to use it in Microsoft SQL 2008 R2 Express for queries.
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Question by:chaverly
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by:SStory
ID: 40601603
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hnasr earned 500 total points
ID: 40601716
For a small database:

Create a new SQL database.
In access, select table/Query in navigation pane > External Data > Export > More > ODBC Database

Follow instructions.
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by:PatHartman
ID: 40602459
With A2010 and earlier, you can use the built in upsizing wizard.  It is on the External data ribbon.  This feature was dropped from A2013 and that leaves you with SSMA as recommended by SStory or a third party tool unless you want to do the tables one at a time as hnasr recommended.
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by:Nick67
ID: 40603591
it could be coded in VBA, but that is a lot of work to go to when the very good, free SSMA tool exists.
Be aware that SSMA comes in 32 bit and 64 bit flavours.
Both run on x86 and x64 platforms.
The correct one to use depends on the version of the connectivity components you have installed.
If you have 32 bit ODBC drivers, you need the 32 bit version
If you have 64 bit ODBC drivers, you need the 64 bit version.
Both install from the download.
Try the 32 bit first if you do not know for certain (it's highly unlikely) that you have installed 64 bit Office.
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by:chaverly
ID: 40613312
Thank you
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by:hnasr
ID: 40613340
Welcome!
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