?
Solved

How to base the sum of a control on the state of another control (checkbox)

Posted on 2015-02-12
5
Medium Priority
?
81 Views
Last Modified: 2015-02-12
I have a subform for which I am summing one of the controls, using the simple expression =Sum([LineTotal])

I would like that sum to only include the records for which a checkbox control is "true", but I'm not certain how to modify my expression to accomplish this. (see attachment)

Thank you in advance.clip.jpg
0
Comment
Question by:Shooter54
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 3
  • 2
5 Comments
 
LVL 29

Accepted Solution

by:
IrogSinta earned 2000 total points
ID: 40606545
=Sum(IIF([CheckBoxFieldName],[LineTotal],0))

Ron
0
 

Author Comment

by:Shooter54
ID: 40606578
Perfect! Thank you very much.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Shooter54
ID: 40606822
I've requested that this question be closed as follows:

Accepted answer: 0 points for Shooter54's comment #a40606578

for the following reason:

Simple and concise solution to what to me was a difficult problem.
0
 
LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:IrogSinta
ID: 40606608
Looks like you inadvertently selected your own comment as the answer.  I suggest you click on Request Attention at the top (right after your question) to someone fix this.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Shooter54
ID: 40606823
I inadvertently accepted my own response as the solution. (sorry, new user) IrogSinta, ID 40606608 provided me the solution. Please resolve.
0

Featured Post

Technology Partners: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

This article describes two methods for creating a combo box that can be used to add new items to the row source -- one for simple lookup tables, and one for a more complex row source where the new item needs data for several fields.
Access developers frequently have requirements to interact with Excel (import from or output to) in their applications.  You might be able to accomplish this with the TransferSpreadsheet and OutputTo methods, but in this series of articles I will di…
Using Microsoft Access, learn some simple rules for how to construct tables in a relational database. Split up all multi-value fields into single values: Split up fields that belong to other things into separate tables: Make sure that all record…
With Microsoft Access, learn how to start a database in different ways and produce different start-up actions allowing you to use a single database to perform multiple tasks. Specify a start-up form through options: Specify an Autoexec macro: Us…
Suggested Courses

765 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question