How to get column width sizes of Linux commands

I ran across this command the other day:

 % finger | grep -v ^Login | cut -b10-34 | sort -u
  Angela Glinos            
  Peng Yi                  
  ordinary user            
  xiaoyu gao               
  J. T. C. Chiu            
  Lok Wilson 

Open in new window


If I understand correctly, the cut -b option will select bytes 10-34 from the output of the finger command. I'm interested in knowing how can one determine the width of the columns in finger (size of bytes)?
TampaJayAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
woolmilkporcCommented:
You're right, "-b" means bytes, "10-34" means the byte positions, starting from 1.

The output columns of "finger" are of fixed width, but since the non-blank content of most columns is of variable length and, moreover, some columns (even in the header) can/will consist of a variable number of words there is no easy way to programmatically determine the column widths.

Since it's a one-time effort I'd simply suggest running the "finger" command and counting (sic!) the characters.

You could redirect the output to a file ("finger > finger.out"), then edit this file with vi/vim. On the right bottom you'll see an indication of the current cursor position in the format "line,column". Use the "column" value to help counting.

The man pages of some commands describe the command output in detail, so you might find the column layout there. Unfortunately, finger's manpage does not have such a description, afaik.
0
 
TintinCommented:
I'd use sed instead of cut

finger | sed 1d | sed -e "s/^[A-z]* *//" -e "s/  .*//"|sort -u
0
 
ozoCommented:
the cut command and the sed command produce different results with the output from my finger
0
 
TampaJayAuthor Commented:
Thank you for the comments. I just ended up using awk to grab the column I needed.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.