Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
?
Solved

Program shortcuts

Posted on 2015-02-16
3
Medium Priority
?
102 Views
Last Modified: 2015-02-19
ShortcutsHi, I'm wondering if from visual studio it's possible to create an app that has various "pinned" shortcuts to the taskbar in windows 7, exactly like in the picture, when right clicking a program pinned to the task bar, it gives you a list of forms or options within the program you can open?

Thank you
0
Comment
Question by:FCapo
  • 2
3 Comments
 
LVL 40
ID: 40612840
Note that all the shortcuts you see are used to launch an application and send it a parameter, not to pass information to an already running application (unless it is a filename, in which case it can be trapped by an application that is registered as the default for the file extension).

What you could do is use a NotifyIcon control in the main form of your application so that it appears in the notification area at the right of the taskbar. You will then be able to link the NotifyIcon to a menu that will show through the NotifyIcon and simply react to the Click on each of the entries in the menu.
0
 
LVL 35

Assisted Solution

by:it_saige
it_saige earned 1000 total points
ID: 40612955
I answered another EE PAQ that dealt with sort of the same type of question (although the asker was wanting to know how to create a menu).  In the other question I do touch upon the TaskList:

http://www.experts-exchange.com/Programming/Languages/.NET/Visual_Basic.NET/Q_28600426.html

Edit:  However, James is correct.  The TaskList is not used to capture an option click (as one might expect), instead it is used to start another application (there are resources on the internet that discuss launching both external and internal tasks using the TaskList).

If you need it to perform a command within your application then my example will show you how.

-saige-
0
 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger) earned 1000 total points
ID: 40613390
You can do almost anything in Windows, as the clever code by it_saige shows. This kind of code is always informative, because you learn about how the system works, and it brings you knowledge that can be useful in different circumstances.

But it is not because you can do something that it is good. Your first concern should always be the usability of your application.

In my centuries (it seems so, and it is partly the case) of working with Windows, I have learned the hard way (and more than once) that even if you can find ways to make the OS interface do things it was not primarily designed to do, you always end up shooting a bullet in your own foot if you do not follow the standards.

As a user, I would never have the reflex to control a currently running application through the ""pinned" shortcuts", because no application do that. This is done either through a menu or a command bar as you have in Oultook for applications that the user is currently working in, or through the system tray icons (nowadays called the notification area) for background applications.

And always as a user, I dislike and even refuse to use applications that forces me to work differently than the Windows standard that come naturally to me. Or applications that clutter my OS environment with things I do not use.

Finally, as a programmer, following the standards is almost always easier to code than trying to do non standard stuff. The user is happy because he knows intuitively how to work with his application, and because it standard interface is not littered with stuff that he does not have the reflex to use. And the programmer is happy, because his job is easier.

This was only an editorial. You do as you want.
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Site Down Detector

Helpful to verify reports of your own downtime, or to double check a downed website you are trying to access.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

A quick guide on how to use Group Policy to create a custom power plan and set it active on Windows 7.
The Windows functions GetTickCount and timeGetTime retrieve the number of milliseconds since the system was started. However, the value is stored in a DWORD, which means that it wraps around to zero every 49.7 days. This article shows how to solve t…
This Micro Tutorial will teach you the basics of configuring your computer to improve its speed. It will also teach you how to disable programs that are running in the background simultaneously. This will be demonstrated using Windows 7 operating…
The Task Scheduler is a powerful tool that is built into Windows. It allows you to schedule tasks (actions) on a recurring basis, such as hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, at log on, at startup, on idle, etc. This video Micro Tutorial is a brief intro…
Suggested Courses
Course of the Month10 days, 2 hours left to enroll

571 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question