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Windows 7 45 users 1 machine different drive mappings

Posted on 2015-02-18
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Last Modified: 2015-03-23
I have a client where they have  about 45 users that at any point can log in from a shared conf room pc to execute a login script

I am not sure if there is any limitation to the # of local profiles, but not all drive mappings from the prior user are always deleted/disconnected cleanly.

Anyone have any suggestions as to how they handled something like this? RDP would be troublesome.

I could just make one user for each department so we have only a handful of profiles?
Is there a limit to the # of profiles on a Win 7 machine? I just dont think it would be a great idea to have 45+ local profiles on a win 7 machine.

Thanks!
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Question by:LICOMPGUY
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Cliff Galiher earned 250 total points
ID: 40617654
I've done a few large scale point-of-sale systems that have many more users than what you are dealing with. Honestly 45 is a relatively small user count and windows can easily handle that (not concurrently, of course.)

 As far as drive mappings, you must have something else going on. In a normal setup, drive maps are stored as a user setting in the user's registry. Which means another user does not have those same mappings (even if they didn't unmap cleanly at log-off.)  Like many other user settings, my default printer can be different than another user's, whether I set my mouse up to be left-handed while another user's is right handed, desktop wallpapers, etc. When one user changes their wallpaper, it doesn't change it for other users. Well, drive mappings work the same way. They are intrinsically per-user by default. There are ways around that, but that would then be an issue with the login script, not with Windows or the number of local profiles.
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by:John Hurst
John Hurst earned 250 total points
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The way I would manage this is by a connection script. Set one up and delete the map before creating it.

NET USE Z: /Delete
NET USE Z: \\server\share

This permits always being able to map a folder.

Set up a script for each user.

I would expect a computer to drag with 45 profiles because of temp files and indexing. Also OST files if an Exchange setup.
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by:LICOMPGUY
ID: 40618161
Guys

Thanks for the responses. So are you saying directly before the net use to map, the line prior should just be a net use z: /delete and that will always clear it out for the net use map to the share?

Thanks!
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by:John Hurst
ID: 40618558
the line prior should just be a net use z: /delete and that will always clear it out for the net use map to the share?   <--- Yes
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by:LICOMPGUY
ID: 40618632
Ok - so every line for a net use to execute a drive mapping, immediately before should use the /delete - correct?

You have done this before and don't see any problem with 45 or so users having a local profile?

I thought I tried this once before and felt it executed so fast that it didn't do the delete consistently.
Have you seen this occur?
Thanks so much
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by:John Hurst
ID: 40618714
so every line for a net use to execute a drive mapping, immediately before should use the /delete - correct?  <-- I would. The purpose is to prevent persistent drives using the drive letter you are trying to map.

I see a dozen users on a computer. I have not had 45 users.
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by:LICOMPGUY
ID: 40628616
Hey John

What seemed to work and the DC is Win2k12, was using the net use * /delete /yes.

The only issue(which I have to test again, is it seemed to delete their home dir mappings which is obtained thru their profile,
so I commented it out until later when I can go back on site.
Would that make sense that it would remove that? If so  - any thoughts on how I could prevent that?
I am guessing that the login script executes after the profile maps the user home dir.
Thanks again!
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by:John Hurst
ID: 40628749
I am guessing that the login script executes after the profile maps the user home dir

I would consolidate the mappings so that you can delete by folder mapped before mapping. The only reason for doing this is to prevent persistent mappings from preventing a new map.

Consolidating mappings into one script will solve the problem.

Otherwise, limit the delete statements to the folders in the script and do not delete other mappings.
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by:LICOMPGUY
ID: 40629629
Hey there

THanks for your help
Can you see any issue if I were to just list out the "NET USE Z: /Delete,  at the beginning of the loginscript, replacing z with all possible drive mapping letters and have the net use delete run for each letter whether or not the user has that drive mapping or not?  Do you think that would slow down the execution of the loginscript or cause it to hang?

Thanks
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by:John Hurst
ID: 40629637
Deleting a mapped drive before mapping again does not slow anything down. Has not for me in years of use.
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by:LeeTutor
ID: 40677894
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

Not enough information to confirm an answer.
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by:John Hurst
ID: 40677895
I think we answered this question very well.

I suggest split:   http:#a40617655  and http:#a40617654
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by:LICOMPGUY
ID: 40681601
All worked out perfectly!

I did a NET USE "n": /Delete at beginning of the scripts so it cleared all - it looks like we are good, Thank you - you were a huge help!!
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by:John Hurst
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@LICOMPGUY - If we helped you out and solved your issue, then you should close the question properly instead of abandoning the question.
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