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HP Proliant DL380 Server Setup

Posted on 2015-02-19
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Last Modified: 2015-02-26
I removed my HP Proliant DL380 Server from the network and from the rack for service. I did not mark where the cables were when I removed them and now I can't remember - Is there a network cable that goes from the router to the server? And then another network cable that runs from the server to the switch? Which ports? The server is my DHCP server.

Thank you!

Robert
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Question by:RobertEhinger
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8 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:Hypercat (Deb)
ID: 40619394
WIthout more information, it's really hard to answer that question other than with a basic "this is the standard" way things are set up: Standard cabling would be to have the server NIC cable go to a switch and the router would also be cabled to a switch on the same network.  Disregarding the possibility of a VLAN setup or other special requirements for that particular server/NIC that would require it to be connected to a certain port or port group on the switch, it could be connected to any switch port that handles the correct speed.

Even on a small network, the cabling should be fully documented from both ends, the physical device location to the switch, and between switches and routers.
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Author Comment

by:RobertEhinger
ID: 40619495
There is no VLAN setup.
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LVL 38

Expert Comment

by:Hypercat (Deb)
ID: 40619571
How many switches on your rack? How many routers? If you have multiple network segments, do you know which segment this server belongs on (i.e., which physical switches and router are in the same segment)?
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Author Comment

by:RobertEhinger
ID: 40619636
There are 2 stacked switches on the rack and we have one router. The router and switches are all on the same segment. All of our clients will pull an IP address in the 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.249 range. The router has a static IP of 192.168.0.250.
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Hypercat (Deb) earned 500 total points
ID: 40619683
Ok, then you're golden.  It really doesn't matter where you connect the server to a switch.  It could be either switch, as long as there's an open port with the right speed capabilities.  Probably both of your switches are the same speed, so basically any standard port (non-fiber) would work.  The router should similarly be plugged into any standard switch port. Presumably the server has a static IP address, so that shouldn't be affected unless you've actually changed the server IP address during whatever troubleshooting process you were doing.

Again, I recommend in the future that you create a map of your switches, identifying each switch port connection to its patch panel port (assuming you have one) or a local device (other switch or server), and from the patch panel back to the physical location of the corresponding wall jack at the other end. The wall jacks should also be labeled with the patch panel port number, if they aren't already. If you ever have any network connection and/or wiring issues, this will be extremely helpful in troubleshooting those types of issues.
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Author Comment

by:RobertEhinger
ID: 40619937
Thank you. Yes the server does have a static IP Address.
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Author Comment

by:RobertEhinger
ID: 40624887
OK, I put the server back online after turning off DHCP in the router. When I went to log on to some of the clients using various student usernames and password the log on time was very long and once the computer did log on it was getting the DNS from the router and not the server. Prior to the repair the DNS was always the IP of the server - 192.168.0.3 but now it is 10.1.10.1. That is the DNS server that the router gets from my ISP. Is this a server problem or a router issue. I don't see where to set a static DNS server in my router. It is a Cisco RVS4000 v2.

Thank you for your help.
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Assisted Solution

by:Hypercat (Deb)
Hypercat (Deb) earned 500 total points
ID: 40625699
Have you rebooted (not just logged off and back on again) all of the clients?  They will retain the old IP addressing information until they're rebooted or the lease actually expires.  So, they need either a reboot or an ipconfig /release and ipconfig /renew from the command line before they will get a DHCP address from the server.  Once they're getting their IPs from the server, the DNS should be the IP address of the server also, as you mentioned.
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