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Best Practices Windows Server 2012 OS Partition Size

Posted on 2015-02-20
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Last Modified: 2016-11-23
Howdy! I have thoroughly scoured the net for best answer...Decided to give the, "Experts" a crack at it.

I recently purchased a Dell T420 Server for a company I perform IT management. Totally "Cadillac" machine: Dual 2.5 GHz, 8 core processors, 6 drives (2 x 300 GB, RAID 1 and 4 x 1.2 TB, RAID 5), 128 GB Ram, Dual power supplies, etc. The machine came pre-installed with OS (Windows Server 2012 Standard R2). However, after looking at the multiple partitions on the "C" drive (2 x 300 GB, RAID 1) and seeing all the junk on board, I decided to re install the OS from scratch. Nice and clean is how I roll!

Following OS installation, updates, configuration, etc., I will be installing SQL Server 2014 Standard, on same. In addition, there will be some smaller 3rd party server hosted programs installed. The server will function as both a domain controller and file server. "D" drive, 4 x 1.2 TB, one of which is a dedicated hot spare, will house the users files.

My question: What is the recommended OS partition size taking the above into consideration? Should I use the entire 300 GB (RAID 1 is a mirrored configuration, so 2 x 300 GB drives is still 300 GB usable). Should I split the page file between C and D virtual drives? Any comments are appreciated...
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Question by:waverobber
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akb earned 500 total points
ID: 40622118
I would allocate the full 300GB to C: drive.
It is quite difficult to extend the C: partition later and over time you could end up many a lot of space tied up in MS updates which are also difficult to relocate.
I'd leave the page file on the C: drive. With 128GB RAM in the server it won't get used much anyway.
Besides HDD's are relatively cheap, even enterprise class drives, so it doesn't really matter if there is some wasted space. At least running out of space on the system drive will never be a worry for you.
Put all your data on a different drive/s.
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Author Closing Comment

by:waverobber
ID: 40622159
Is exactly the way I was thinking...Just needed that little vote of confidence...Thanks for your rapid response! Cheers
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