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Option :sql server compatible syntax ansi 92

Posted on 2015-02-20
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I am upgrading several Access 2003 databases to Access 2013.  These are slit databases with Access fornt ends and backends.

One of the options that can be set in the 'Object Designers' window of the 'Access Options is:

sql server compatible syntax ansi 92
  'This Database'                              can be checked
  or
  'Default for New Databases'       can be checked'

I have read that the difference is that queries etc.. have to be Ansi 92 compliant if this box is checked for an existing database.  Is this also true of any SQL executed in the VBA code?

Without looking at every query I have no idea if the queries would be compliant since I didn't create most of them.  Seems like the safe thing to do would be to leave this box unchecked for database being upgraded from earlier versions of Access.
However, upgrading to 2013 is just the first step in the long term plan, which will later transition the backend database, now in Access to SQL Server.

Step 1. Upgrade to the 2013 version of Access, test and install in production using an Access DB as the data respository.
Later, as a separate project
Step 2. Replace the Access backend with SQL Server.

I just want to make you aware of the long term plan, in case it would influence your answer to the question:  Which of these options should I choose when upgrading from 2003 to 2013 and what are the implications of the choice.
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Question by:mlcktmguy
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by:Gustav Brock
ID: 40622766
If you don't mark this option, you will use ANSI-89 which is what Access uses by default for SQL.

A reason for marking the ANSI-92 option is that it makes it easier to interchange SQL between SQL Server and Access. If you have no plans for this, continue using ANSI-89.

/gustav
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PatHartman earned 2000 total points
ID: 40625073
Whether you convert the BE to SQL Server or not, you can leave the default as ANSI-89 syntax.  There isn't any benefit to moving to a different version since ACE doesn't support newer operations anyway.  ANSI-92 is pretty old and there are newer standards.  The ODBC driver takes care of any conversion that is necessary so I wouldn't spend the time and money to change the syntax for no real benefit.
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Author Closing Comment

by:mlcktmguy
ID: 40628468
Thanks you, that is exactly the kind of detailed feedback I was hoping for.
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