difference between two internet speeds

Isp: Currently using 30mbs
a new isp has a limit of 15mbs but a better deal

what would I lose?

are there additional metrixs that I do not know about
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rgb192Asked:
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jmcgConnect With a Mentor OwnerCommented:
Well, for instance, our home internet occasionally suffers from over-commitment by us users, so that competition for bandwidth can cause Netflix to break streaming.

In some neighborhoods, other users outside your house, but sharing some of the network infrastructure, can do the same thing. It depends on how well your internet provider has constructed their network.

My advice would be to seek out others in your vicinity who subscribe to the two providers and ask them about how well it works for Netflix. The "Netflix buffering problem" is well known and, for a while, there was suspicion that the cable internet providers were unfairly slowing Netflix traffic down, hence all the noise about "net neutrality". Some providers do a pretty good job, but some are relatively terrible and it can vary from one locale to another.
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Rob_JeffreyIT/ProgrammingCommented:
When discussing internet speed there are two metrics - upload bandwidth and download bandwidth.
When you say 30Mbs, that is most likely download speed only.  A basic DSL line is 6Mb down and 800Kbps up.  Upload speed is important if you are using peer to peer file sharing or host services such as a remotely viewable DVR.

The other metric that isn't related to speed is the transfer amount.  If you have a limit on how much data you can upload and/or download per month - this may impact your decision.
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jmcgOwnerCommented:
Here are some things to think about:

1) Your network bandwidth demands are something that only you or your ISP can really measure. If your provider can provide statistics or graphs of your traffic over the last few weeks or months, that can give you a good idea of whether dropping to a nominally lower-speed connection will pose a problem for you. It's also possible your router can give you statistics about your usage over time (if it can't, think hard about getting one that can).

The main reason you would want to stay with a higher bandwidth (more expensive) connection is if your traffic data shows that you spend significant periods of time with sustained traffic at or near the peak bandwidth available. It would be hard to guess what your bandwidth needs are without more details about how your are using the internet at your site.

2) The speed your provider says they provide you may not in practice be the speed you get. Staying on top of this requires keeping your own statistics and doing periodic tests to see if you are getting the bandwidth that's on the bill. There may be times of day when the provider's connection to the Internet backbone is underprovisioned compared with the simultaneous aggregate demand of their various subscribers, so everyone's actual bandwidth available during those times comes out lower than advertised.

3) Reliability/availability of the connection can become a bigger concern than bandwidth. At one place where I worked, after a disappointingly long outage with our provider, we installed a separate connection to fall back on (not as much bandwidth, not as expensive). As best we could determine, once past the telephone poles carrying the wires from our facility to the nearby highway, the two connections took different paths to get to the providers' separate facilities and on from there to the internet. [Backhoe accidents cutting fiber cables have often shown that what were thought to be separated paths were really not; there's only so much you can do.] If you're a commercial concern, you want to understand the provider's Service Level Agreement and how an internet outage affects your business.
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Michael-BestCommented:
Your ISP rated speed and what you actually get depend on various factors.
Test your present speed during business hours and again late at night when internet speeds are faster due to less use by others.
Use speedtest.net
http://www.speedtest.net/

You have to decide what up and down speed is suited to your own needs, and also consider your total monthly data if the ISP has a monthly limit.
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MereteCommented:
Yes they probably have what we call here in Ozzie those hidden details in your contract  Peak and off Peak.
I found with TPG that their peak time is from 8 pm to 3 am so that means it is throttled down to a lower speed during peak times and you get faster speeds off Peak but at 3 am.
All that free unlimited speeds is crap basically the whole time normal people use the internet at night is peak time.
 I left them
Michael that's the same speed test I used good tester that one.
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rgb192Author Commented:
The other metric that isn't related to speed is the transfer amount.  If you have a limit on how much data you can upload and/or download per month - this may impact your decision.
How can I see?



If your provider can provide statistics or graphs of your traffic over the last few weeks or months, that can give you a good idea of whether dropping to a nominally lower-speed connection will pose a problem for you. It's also possible your router can give you statistics about your usage over time (if it can't, think hard about getting one that can).
So if I am using netflix on tuesday feb 24th, can I see that my usage spiked?


so everyone's actual bandwidth available during those times comes out lower than advertised.
Is this speedtest.net?

You have to decide what up and down speed is suited to your own needs, and also consider your total monthly data if the ISP has a monthly limit.
Monthly limit of What?

hidden details in your contract  Peak and off Peak.
How can I see?
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MereteCommented:
I don't think  netflix applies here
Netflix, Inc. is a provider of on-demand Internet streaming media available to viewers in all of North America, South America and parts of Europe
You are someone @ isp .com that ISP is your internet service provider
They should own a home page where you can log into your internet account to check your usage.
This is the homepage of my ISP in Australia
https://www.my.telstra.com.au/myaccount/home
Log into your ISP accountonce I log in then I can see what my usage and statistics are
Internet usage and statsUpload and download
upload-download.JPG
If you want to test your upload and download speeds then use the speedtest
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jmcgOwnerCommented:
I was thinking of a bandwidth graph at a somewhat finer-grained level of detail, something like this one captured from our home router running the Tomato firmware

Bandwidth example
As you can see, there are fairly substantial periods where our usage is clipped by the download bandwidth limit at 3Mbps. It is those periods where a higher-bandwidth connection would make a difference. You can't see it in this graph, but the clipping at the upload bandwidth limit is very visible when someone gets back from a day where they've taken a few pictures and their iPhone or iPad has been waiting to see a wifi connection to upload all the photos to iCloud. It can take hours to get everything safely uploaded. We know that we need a better internet connection, we just can't get one.

You haven't disclosed your location or the names of the two providers, so it's hard to generalize about the sorts of contract details that can affect your decision-making: data caps, peak and off-peak, quality of support, etc.
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MereteCommented:
If you wanted to go the route as suggested above with a graph reporting live
 I use this free open source FreeMeter Bandwidth Monitor For Windows
http://sourceforge.net/projects/freemeter/
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nickg5Commented:
What is the name of your ISP?
Is this personal or business use or both?
What type of internet connection do you have now or may switch to?

You need to consider bandwidth and it's sister which is bandwidth throughout. They are both the amount data from one device to another during a period of time.
Bandwidth may be told to you like our ISP does when we inquire. They tell us the bandwidth they quote on our package is a maximum and we may or may not get the maximum. Bandwidth is what they advertise but "throughout" will be what you actually receive.

It sounds like you have cable or fiber optic as DSL is usually slower in capabilities.

Business?
You may or may not need a business grade service. They do cost more but you do get higher speeds and connections that are more reliable. The extra cost may not be worth it depending on your uses.

The speed test given above is one we use. It tells us what download and upload speeds we have and we compare them to what our package is supposed to be giving us. And sure enough the "throughout" is lower at certain times of day.
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rgb192Author Commented:
What is the name of your ISP?
Is this personal or business use or both?
time warner cable personal
30mb
but speedtest.net never gets above 10mb

I do not think my isp gives fancy charts pictures and graphs for reporting
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rgb192Author Commented:
did I answer questions correctly?
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MereteCommented:
rgb192 I cannot access this information being in Australia and donot have an account but
go here and log into your account then look around for usage stats uploads downloads etc
https://myservices.timewarnercable.com/ 
use this one and the first video is the how to usage tracker, this will likely answer many of your questions regarding is the package you currently  have suitable.
https://www.timewarnercable.com/en/support/twc-videos.html
usage tracker
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rgb192Author Commented:
thank you for this link:
https://www.timewarnercable.com/en/support/twc-videos.html

total usage in gigabytes in hour, day, week, month

this information applies best to customers of a mobile data plan that do not want to exceed their monthly usage maximum


My question is different because I have no monthly usage maximum
My question is watching a movie on Netflix, will it take a long time to load if I do not use the 30mbps plan
On a cheaper plan, netflix would load slowly and I could take bathroom / coffee breaks in the middle of a movie.
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Michael-BestCommented:
"My question is watching a movie on Netflix, will it take a long time to load if I do not use the 30mbps plan"

Yes, the slower the contracted speed plan the slower the download time will take.
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jmcgOwnerCommented:
Netflix can be successfully viewed on a 3Mbps service, so either plan will let you watch Netflix. Whether you will experience breaks in the streaming depends on other factors.
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rgb192Author Commented:
Whether you will experience breaks in the streaming depends on other factors.
what are examples of other factors because I am paying for quick internet just for netflix which I am not subscribed to right now so I can not test
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rgb192Author Commented:
keywords I can search for and ask others. Thanks.
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