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Bridge Mode

Hi,
I have a user who is setup with a TPLink router connected to a home wireless Broadband (no fiber or DSL in the area).  This connection is taken from the roof (from the TP Link router) to a TP Link switch in one of their offices and is then cabled throughout the house to the kitchen, living room and all bedrooms.  This users says the internet keeps dropping and she wants wireless throughout the house.  A colleague of mine has suggested that we purchase a Linksys EA6200 Router with multiple switches that will be placed through the house as well as Cisco WAP 371 access points.  My question is, I have asked him why we need another router (Linksys EA6200) as we already have the TP Link from the Wireless BB Provider.  His response was he was going to put one of them in bridge mode.  Can you please explain what the advantage is to do this and why he just doesn't replace the TP Link switch with Cisco for example and plug the TP Link Router from the roof directly into the Switch.
Cheers
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minniejp
Asked:
minniejp
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1 Solution
 
John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
If the device is giving an internal address (192.168... type of address) , then I do not see what bridge mode would do.  You would attach your own router or switch to the device. You would hook up a LAN port of the router to the device.

why he just doesn't replace the TP Link switch with Cisco for example and plug the TP Link Router from the roof directly into the Switch

I think you can do this as well.

I used a hotspot device at a client and the easiest approach for that device was a small wireless router. (LAN port to LAN port) It worked just fine.
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minniejpAuthor Commented:
Yes, it is on the same IP range, this is why I was confused.
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John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
I would suggest the simplest possible setup:

Modem device (TP Link router) which gives internal IP address. Hook up a good wireless router LAN to LAN and that really should be all you need.

Maybe have one spare computer hooked up by Ethernet to a TP Link LAN port to see if dropout is wireless or TP Link.
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minniejpAuthor Commented:
Do you mean a Wireless router or a Wireless access point?
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John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
I would use a good wireless router that can be set up as an access point. That is what I use (Cisco RV180 or RV220) because they are more flexible over the long haul.
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minniejpAuthor Commented:
I would agree, still not sure why he was putting it in bridge mode?  Is it possible to share the load on the routers?
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John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
The load on the TP Link will be the combined load of all the devices on it. This is the same for all small network setups. It should not be an issue if the TP Link is fast enough.
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minniejpAuthor Commented:
Apologies for my lack of knowledge, how do I know if it is fast enough?
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John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
You can run speedtest.net from a computer hooked up by Ethernet to a LAN port on the TP Link (or by Wi-Fi with nothing else connected). It should match the ISP specifications for the TP Link. Test and see if it does what you wish.
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John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
@minniejp  - Thanks and I was happy to help.
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