PowerShell Code - Is a date in this Array/HashTable

Okay, I'm still learning, and I am trying to write a function (which will basically be recursive) to return a 'good' date. I want to build either an array or hash table (not sure which) of holidays. I do not have any reason to retrieve a specific holiday, I only want to know if a specific date is in the table.
Basically, I pass a date to the function. Using Switch() if it is a Saturday, Sunday or Monday, I subtract either 1, 2 or 3 days respectively. Any other date, I subtract 1 day. Then I want to check if the (adjusted) date is in the array/hash table. If it is, I want to call the function again, passing date - 1. The return value will be a good date.

Thus, if I am working with a Tuesday and the previous day is a holiday, the call to the function would calculate the Monday, determine it is a holiday, and call the function passing Sunday's date (calculated Monday - 1), which would in turn return Friday's date.

Here is what I have so far, but I think, from what I'm reading, what I really need is a hash table. Just having a bit of trouble putting it together. Note that the value passed (and needed to be returned) for $procDate is a string in the format of yyyy-mm-dd. As I indicated, I do not need to know what the date is, associate it with any specific holiday, etc. I just need to know if the date I am working with is in the array/table.
$holidays = @("2013-11-28","2013-12-25","2014-01-01","2014-01-20","2014-02-17","2014-04-18","2014-05-26","2014-07-04","2014-09-01","2014-02-17","2014-11-27","2014-12-25","2014-01-01","2014-01-19")

Function GetWorkDay($procDate)
{
	$dow = (Get-Date($procDate)).DayOfWeek
	$procDate = Switch ($dow)
	{
		"Saturday" { (Get-Date($processDate)).AddDays(-1).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") }
		"Sunday" { (Get-Date($processDate)).AddDays(-2).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") }
		"Monday" { (Get-Date($processDate)).AddDays(-3).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") }
		default { (Get-Date($processDate)).AddDays(-1).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") }
	}
	If ($procDate is a holiday) # pseudo-code
	{
		$procDate = GetWorkDay((Get-Date($procDate)).AddDays(-1))
	}
	Return $procDate
}

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dbbishopAsked:
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RobSampsonCommented:
Hi, first off, an array would be more suitable for single values.  Second, in your Switch you had $processDate and not $procDate.

Then, to determine whether the date exists, we use
$holidays -contains $procDate

Regards,

Rob.

$holidays = "2013-11-28","2013-12-25","2014-01-01","2014-01-20","2014-02-17","2014-04-18","2014-05-26","2014-07-04","2014-09-01","2014-02-17","2014-11-27","2014-12-25","2014-01-01","2014-01-19"

Function GetWorkDay($procDate)
{
	$dow = (Get-Date($procDate)).DayOfWeek
	$procDate = Switch ($dow)
	{
		"Saturday" { (Get-Date($procDate)).AddDays(-1).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") }
		"Sunday" { (Get-Date($procDate)).AddDays(-2).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") }
		"Monday" { (Get-Date($procDate)).AddDays(-3).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") }
		default { (Get-Date($procDate)).AddDays(-1).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") }
	}
    If ($holidays -contains $procDate)
	{
        $procDate = GetWorkDay((Get-Date($procDate)).AddDays(-1))
	}
	Return $procDate
}

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aikimarkCommented:
You can avoid some iteration for the holiday search if you use the -contains operator.
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aikimarkCommented:
In the following example, the $d variable, contains a datetime value.
Example:
$holidays -contains (get-date -date $d.adddays(-1) -uformat "%Y-%m-%d")

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You can separate some of these functions, updating your $d variable, as you step back in time.
$d = $d.adddays(-1)
$holidays -contains (get-date -date $d -uformat "%Y-%m-%d")

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RobSampsonCommented:
I haven't tested this too much, but you can also do away with the recursive call by using a loop that rechecks the date.

Rob.

$holidays = "2013-11-28","2013-12-25","2014-01-01","2014-01-20","2014-02-17","2014-04-18","2014-05-26","2014-07-04","2014-09-01","2014-02-17","2014-11-27","2014-12-25","2014-01-01","2014-01-19"

Function GetWorkDay($procDate)
{
    $recheck = $true
	While ($recheck -eq $true)
    {
        $recheck = $false
        $dow = (Get-Date($procDate)).DayOfWeek
	    $procDate = Switch ($dow)
	    {
		    "Saturday" { (Get-Date($procDate)).AddDays(-1).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") }
		    "Sunday" { (Get-Date($procDate)).AddDays(-2).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") }
		    "Monday" { (Get-Date($procDate)).AddDays(-3).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") }
		    default { (Get-Date($procDate)).AddDays(-1).ToString("yyyy-MM-dd") }
	    }
        If ($holidays -contains $procDate)
	    {
            $procDate = (Get-Date($procDate)).AddDays(-1)
            $recheck = $true
	    }
    }
	Return $procDate
}

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dbbishopAuthor Commented:
Had I not been working 50-60 hours/week for the last couple of weeks on a project that has everyone breathing down my neck, I might of figured that one out, because I think I did something similar awhile back. But, I gotta love EE. Thanks!
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RobSampsonCommented:
No problem, we're here to help (and learn)!  ;-)

Rob.
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