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Windows Server network adapter DNS server settings

Hi all,

We are running a simple network with a few workstations.

Instead of letting the router assign an IP address to our server, I want to assign it a static IP address of 192.168.1.10.

If I go into the network adapter settings, i can assign the IP address - no problem. But I'm a little fuzzy as to what to put in for "Use the following DNS server addresses". What's the best practice policy for this?

Thanks in advance.
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Go-Bruins
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Go-Bruins
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CorinTackNetwork EngineerCommented:
Presuming your server is acting as the DNS server for your network, you would put 127.0.0.1, which is the address for 'this machine'. 99% of the time, this will be enough to get the server access to your network and the Internet.

In the event that you fall into that 1% where you suddenly find the server without Internet access (which is based on the setup of your router/firewall, usually), you can add a secondary DNS server of any public DNS. The easiest ones for me to remember are the Google ones at 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4.
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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Thank you for the response.

We have a very simple network. I don't think our server is acting as the DNS server (unless the initial install defaults to it). I think the Verizon router is acting as the DHCP and DNS server (I think).
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CorinTackNetwork EngineerCommented:
You would, in that case, put the router's IP as the DNS, and could add a public DNS server as well if you wanted.

The easiest way to tell would be to look at a PC's configuration (using ipconfig /all) and see what its DNS servers are listed as. If they have the server's IP listed, then it is acting as DNS; if they have the router's IP listed, then it is actually your DNS.
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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Thanks much!
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