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Getting Windows Server Backup to work with Advanced Format Disks

I have a server running Windows Server 2008 Standard. Windows Server Backup is constantly failing with "incorrect function". It appears that it doesn't get along with 4096 byte sector drives.  (My backup drive is a Transcend TS1TSJ25M3  StoreJet 1TB USB 3.0., which appears to have 4096 byte sectors).

Will this hotfix fix this problem?:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2553708
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DaveWWW
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DaveWWW
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2 Solutions
 
noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
No. It will not. The problem is in VHD files which MS stores backup in. The problem was fixed only in Windows 2012R2 and Windows 8.1
You have either to store backup on smaller (older drives) or you need to use a third party backup tool which does not have this problem.
Like Paragon Hard Disk Manager 15 Server Basic. http://www.paragon-software.com/small-business/hdm-business/
Its interface is easier and the costs are not hight.
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DaveWWWAuthor Commented:
I have a server running Windows Server 2008 R2 and it is backing up fine to this drive.  Was the issue fixed in 2008 R2?
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
Does this drive emulate 512Bytes per sector? Use the FSutil as recommended in the article you've posted. If the drive is capable of emulating this 512Byte sector then this hotfix will help you. If not - then no way.
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DaveWWWAuthor Commented:
The drive that is currently working with Server 2008 Standard is here: http://www.transcend-info.com/Products/No-284
The model is TS1TSJ25M3.  I thought this model was 4096 bytes per sector, but can't find it in the spec.
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
You need to check the sector size using this command in command line:
fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo x: and press enter. Instead of X put the drive letter that your external drive has.
You will see which type of drive you have.
See this excellent article: http://www.rmprepusb.com/tutorials/4k_hdd
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DaveWWWAuthor Commented:
Thanks, I'll check and report back.
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Seth SimmonsSr. Systems AdministratorCommented:
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

Not enough information to confirm an answer.
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
The answer is given in http:#a40646684
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