data cd vs mp3 cd

Hi,

To listen in my car which CD is better data or mp3?

I have bunch of audio songs i want to create CD out of it to play in my car. Which software does that CD cutting for free effectively and easily. Any step by step process would be appreciated. My dell laptop has windows 7 OS not sure any inbuilt software for that.

please advise
LVL 7
gudii9Asked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

EirmanChief Operations ManagerCommented:
Most newer car audio systems play MP3s files. You will see MP3 on the front of the unit if it does.
MP3s will sound as good as a standard CD on most car systems.
You might notice the difference on a quality indoor HiFi.
MP3 CDs hold about 7 times as many songs as regular CDs.

You can burn an MP3 cd from windows file explorer or windows media player.
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/burn-cd-dvd-media-player#1TC=windows-7

To burn a regular CD from MP3 files ...
http://www.techsupportalert.com/content/how-create-audio-cd-mp3-files-using-free-software.htm
0
rindiCommented:
Depends on the CD player you have. Often neither data nor mp3 is supported, but rather just audio CD's. Some players also support audio CD's with CD-Text (that way you can edit song titles that then show on the display). Newer players might also support Data CD's with MP3's on them. Besides that, if it is newer, it probably also supports USB sticks with MP's on them. If they do I wouldn't use CD's at all...
0
William FulksSystems Analyst & WebmasterCommented:
First you need to see if your car supports the MP3 CD format.

Otherwise, you can burn the MP3 files just like a data disc. Depending on how your stereo organizes the music, I like to create folders for the artist then subfolders for the album name and keep the tracks separate.
0
10 Tips to Protect Your Business from Ransomware

Did you know that ransomware is the most widespread, destructive malware in the world today? It accounts for 39% of all security breaches, with ransomware gangsters projected to make $11.5B in profits from online extortion by 2019.

BillDLCommented:
There are several things you need to know before deciding whether to burn Audio CDs or MP3 CDs.  The obvious have been covered above by others, such as the need to have an in-car player that actually supports MP3 playback.

I am not sure how much you know or have researched about the difference between these two different types of CDs, but here's a summary that hopefully explains it.

MP3 files are compressed.  When you burn these files to CD to create an Audio CD, the content is expanded and converted into a different format.  On an Audio CD it is the combined playback time of all the songs that dictates how many tracks can be burned.  Typically an "80 minute" CD-R will hold slightly less than 80 minutes worth of songs (including the silence between them) when burned as an Audio CD.  There is an overhead for the "lead-in" and "lead-out" data that holds information about where the tracks start and end, and the track titles.  So, if your original source MP3s are of songs that last on average 4 minutes, you will be able to burn about 20 songs to an Audio CD.

An MP3 CD is really just a "data CD" in that you are burning files (and possibly also folders) to it.  No conversion of the MP3 files takes place, so it is the combined file size of all the MP3 files that dictates how many can be burned to an MP3 CD.  Typically a CD-R has a 700MB capacity, so if your MP3 files average out at 5MB, you would be able to fit approximately 140 MP3 files onto the CD.  That would be over 11 hours of playback time.

Some car and domestic players may still need to see a "playlist" file.  For MP3 files this is usually an *.M3U file.  It is a simple text-based file that contains the names of all the MP3 files on separate lines.  I would guess that most modern in-car CD players don't need a playlist file and will just recognise the presence of MP3 (and often also WMA) files, and just start playing them back.

When you use CD Burning software to create an Audio CD, you can arrange the tracks into your preferred play order, and they will stay that way on the burned CD.  When you burn a "data CD" (and this includes an MP3 CD), the files will be stored on the CD in the same sort order as they would on your computer's hard drive, i.e. in ascending alpha-numeric order.  The only way to rearrange the order of the MP3 files is to rename them the way you want them.  You can add a 001, 002, 003, etc in front of the file name, but this can take up valuable space on the small screen that shows the MP3's file name as the audio file loads in your car's player.

It might be possible to control the playback order by creating an *.M3U playlist in the hope that the player recognises it and uses it.

William Fulks mentioned burning a complete folder structure to CD so that the MP3s are logically arranged.  You have to remember that you shouldn't be fiddling with anything that takes your attention off the road when driving the car.  Different car players may have different ways of presenting folders, but usually you will have to use "arrow buttons" to navigate in and out of folders.  This is how an MP3 file with the audio files in folders and sub-folders loads on a domestic DVD player.

Another aspect of MP3 CDs is that the CD itself usually takes a while to load, and each song usually takes slightly longer to load than the tracks on an Audio CD.  It could be long enough to cause you irritation, for example when skipping forward through songs.

What you see on the player's display may be important to you.  You may be able to take some control over how much information it displays for each song.  A commercial Audio CD has information on the data section that is read by the player, and (if capable) the player will show the Album Title, Artist, Date, Track Name and number, etc.  MP3s will only be able to have this information displayed if they contain this information in the ID3 Tags.  Most computer MP3 players allow you to retrieve this information from an online CD Database when you are ripping the songs from other CDs, or you can add them if they are your own recordings.

I only have a tiny scrolling screen on my basic car CD player, so I always delete all the ID3 tags from MP3s before I burn them so that all it shows is the file name of the MP3.  I rename the files with short names so I can recognise them instantly as the next song loads and I can skip to the next without having to take my eyes off the road too long.

The biggest benefit of MP3 CDs is the fact that you can store so many songs on one, and you can have many hours worth of playback without having to keep swapping Audio CDs around.  Audio CDs take up space in the car in their cases, and it is distracting for a driver having to eject them, put them in the correct case, then open another and load that.

Blank CDs are really cheap, so you should experiment and see how it goes.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
gudii9Author Commented:
First you need to see if your car supports the MP3 CD format.

it does support mp3, auxilary cable and radio also there
0
gudii9Author Commented:
if i go to amazon which cd type i should buy. I tried different CDs like writable, rewritable etc nothing worked for me.

Even in walmart can you suggest some CD company or link which i can use to buy?
is writable better or re-writable better??

what other things i should look to purchase these CDs like lenth of audio etc?
please advise
0
gudii9Author Commented:
MP3 CDs hold about 7 times as many songs as regular CDs.

i like this. I have lot of collection to listen.
0
gudii9Author Commented:
You can burn an MP3 cd from windows file explorer or windows media player.
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/burn-cd-dvd-media-player#1TC=windows-7

does it comes default in windows 7 ultimate operating system laptop?
how to check?
0
gudii9Author Commented:
To burn a regular CD from MP3 files ...

you mean as below right

To burn a regular CD from audio files ...

any kind of audio type is fine like wmv, mp3 etc to burn regular CD??
0
rindiCommented:
If it supports MP3, just burn the files to a CD in data mode. You can take any CD-R (CD-RW usually don't work in car CD players). Also make sure you don't buy DVD's, those will most likely not work. If you have an inkjet printer that can print directly to CD's, I would suggest you buy CD's that can be printed to. This would be shown on the package.

One thing I also always make sure of is that when burning anything, I use the lowest available speed. CD's burnt at low speeds tend to be readable on more players and last longer. I don't know whether the built in tools of Windows allow you to set those speeds, and even if they may be better than on previous windows versions, they are still rather limited, so I use 3rd party tools. The one I use most is InfraRecorder, which is free:

http://portableapps.com/apps/utilities/infrarecorder_portable
0
BillDLCommented:
Hi gudii9

To address a couple of the follow-on questions you asked.

"CD-R" is the blank CD type you want.  They come in a standard size that will be indicated as both "700 MB" (that's MegaBytes capacity) and "800 minutes".  I stay in the UK, so comparitive values aren't immediately apparent to me.  Taking the Verbatim "cake box" container of 100 CD-R blanks at wal-mart:
http://www.walmart.com/c/kp/cd-r-discs?facets=category%3ABlank+CDs
22.00 USD = 14.90 GBP
That's 22 cents per CD to you and 15 pence to me.
I think that's pretty much the same actual "cost" to both of us, and is pretty cheap when you think about it.

Of course, you probably don't need 100 CD blanks, but if you sort the listing into price order low to high;
http://www.walmart.com/c/kp/cd-r-discs?facets=category%3ABlank+CDs&sort=4
AND IGNORE THE CD-RW (re-writeable) discs, you can get 5 pack and 10 packs.

Obviously on a spindle in a "cake box" you would either need standard CD "crystal cases" (and cardboard inserts if you want to be able to identify the CDs from the outside of the cases), or one of those zip-up binders that contains fuzzy-backed clear polythene pockets:
http://www.walmart.com/search/?query=cd%20storage%20case&typeahead=cd%20storage

Remember that if you are going to write on the face of burned CDs, only use a pen designed for the purpose.  Standard sharpies can melt the plastic if they contain solvents.
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Sharpie-CD-DVD-Twin-Tip-Marker-Pens-Black-2-pk/39108355
Obviously you may like to consider rindi's suggestion about CDs that support being printed onto if you have a capable printer.  DON'T put stickers onto the face of CDs unless thay are for that purpose and you have the tool that allows you to align then perfectly, because that can imbalance the CD which spins at very high speed inside a player.

Brand names?  Very subjective and as much a personal preference as many other computing accessories.  The recognised names like Verbatim, Maxell, Imation, and Memorex could very easily be mass produced in the same factory as the Kodak ones.  I would tend to avoid generic supermarket brands that are likely to have less stringent quality control.

Write Speed?  You may see 48x and 52x against CD-R products.  This is the theoretical MAXIMUM write speed, where 1x is the slowest.  A CD/DVD Writer DRIVE usually has the maximum write speeds for CD-R, CD-RW, and DVD written on it somewhere.  Practically all CD Writer Drives will be able to write to a CD-R blank at 52x but, as rindi mentioned, don't burn CDs at their maximum speed.  Knock it down to something like 12x or 16x burn speeds and you will have less wasted discs.

If the burner is trying to burn too fast it may not be supplied with the data fast enough and a pause can cause an error whereby this is reported and it just spits out a coffee cup coaster.  if the hard drive containing the audio files being fetched and burned labours at any time or is slow, the disc will be ruined.  If you set the write speed in the CD Burning software to 12x or 16x you will rarely get ruined CDs.

I don't think you can set the maximum burn speed of the CD Writer drive from within the "properties" dialog, but I'm sure that you can do so in the user settings of Windows Media Player if you are using that to burn Audio CDs.  For greater control you need, as rindi has mentioned, 3rd-party software.  I like infrarecorder also, however I have used a great many free titles over the years.

Most CD-burning software allows you to have the data buffered so that if the hard drive stutters or slows down while the data is being read from it, the burner drive can keep working with the data in the temporary memory buffer.  I'm afraid my mind has gone blank regarding the name normally given to this setting ..... Aaah, yes I do.  "Buffer Under-Run Control".  It's been a while since I burned any CDs ;-)

It is usually better to have your audio source files on a hard drive that is fixed to your computer than on an external USB drive, because those are slower than normal hard drives.

If the software supports it, you can use MP3, WAV, WMA, or perhaps others, as your source audio files to burn an AUDIO CD.

You would have to have a car player that supports WMA and MP3 file formats to burn an "MP3 CD" (the data CD with the files burned to it rather than the Audio CD format as you would buy commercially) using WMA files.  Not all car players will recognise WMA files even if they can play MP3 CDs.

I hope this addresses some of your further queries.  Don't hesitate to ask about any other things that are puzzling or confusing to you.
0
gudii9Author Commented:
so if your MP3 files average out at 5MB, you would be able to fit approximately 140 MP3 files onto the CD.  That would be over 11 hours of playback time.
so i need to look for CD R.

I tried CD RW and DVDs also which did not work earlier.

Can i purchase below and test to see how it works to cut mp3 songs of say 11 hour lenght

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Maxell-648450-48x-Write-Once-CD-R-For-Data-10-spindle-Carded-For-Peg-Hooks/13259141

Please advise
0
rindiCommented:
CD-RW and DVD's will normally not work in car players. Only CD-R's. It really doesn't matter what product you get. Just walk into a shop and buy some. It's not worth ordering them and having to pay extra for postage. I also don't agree with the above of not buying them in supermarkets. Those are usually just products which use another label and are probably the same as brand products.

The reason to burn at the lowest speed possible, is not because the PC can't handle the speed and always needs to catch up. That may have been the reason 2 decades ago, when you had CPU's that were measured in MHz and not GHz, and the CD writers just came out and didn't use technologies like "burn-proof" or whatever the manufacturers call them, and disk drives were small and slow compared to today.

It is rather because the CD/DVD drives are cheap mass-products, even though they are high tech and use moving parts. The manufacturers can't afford to waste time calibrating them to the best standard, and because of that the drives will be slightly different in their settings. This means that a CD written on one drive might be slightly off for another drive and not readable. If you burn it a lower speed, the signal that writes to the CD is stronger and that will make it more likely to be read on a greater number of different drives.
0
gudii9Author Commented:
CD-RW and DVD's will normally not work in car players. Only CD-R's.

That explains my failure of playing some of CD tests in my car
0
BillDLCommented:
Thank you gudii9
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Windows OS

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.