In-place upgrade from SBS 2008 to WS2012 with DC and Exchange 2007

Hello,

I am planning an in-place upgrade of a server for a client. They currently have:
SBS 2008 (Server 2008 Standard FE)
- Domain Controller
- AD DS / AD CS
- Exchange 2007
- Few other Server Roles (DHCP, DNS, etc.)
- SQL Database
- Less than 10 users

They have to upgrade to Server 2012 or WS 2012 R2 because a few applications won't be supported anymore in the Server 2008 environment.

The information I gathered about upgrading the server seems fairly straightforward for the Domain Controller and Active Directory, however the problem is mostly Exchange.

What do I need to have to be able to do the same things as the old 2008 server?
Which version of Windows Server 2012? Essentials doesn't take in Exchange, however virtualization is possible? Would I need to buy another licence (WS2012 Standard) just for the virtualized server?
Should I just get a WS2012 Standard, even if I have less than 10 uers?
As for the Exchange, what should I do? If I upgrade OS to 2012, Exchange 2007 isn't compatible with WS2012. Do I upgrade the Exchange on the old server and then upgrade to WS2012? I'm at a loss here.

Thanks.
martinlalancetteAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
jkeegan123Commented:
SBS 2008 does not have an upgrade path that is very straightforward....from a licensing pack they have the TRANSITION PACK which basically is the difference in price between SBS and full Exchange.  You have a few options that I will lay out:

1.  Upgrade to Exchange 2010 / 2013 full edition.  
2.  Upgrade to Windows SBS 2011 (which runs on the equivalent of Windows 2008 R2 and runs Exchange 2010) note that SBS 2011 has been declared END OF LIFE, however Exchange 2010 and Windows 2008 R2 do not expire from a support POV for a very long time, 2020 IIRC.  This option would be good because the licensing is much less expensive.
3.  Upgrade to Windows 2012 Essentials and put email with Office365 in the cloud.  This is the Microsoft recommended  and supported transition / upgrade path.

For option 1, you would have the most flexibility BUT the licensing would be the most expensive.  For this you would need:  

- Windows 2012 R2 Standard or Windows 2008 R2 standard (MSRP $849)
- Exchange 2013 Standard Server (MSRP $689)
- Exchange 2013 Client CAL's x 10 (MSRP $74 per user)
- Windows 2012 client CALs x 10 (MSRP $34 per user)
- VMWare / Hyper-V for virtualization?  VMWARE MSRP-$540 MSRP for ESSENTIALS KIT, MICROSOFT MSRP HYPER-V would just require an additional server 2012 R2 license - MSRP $849

-----> total licensing cost:  849 + 849 + 689 + 74(10) + 34 (10) = $2778 (without virtualization)

You would have to promote the new Windows  2012 R2 server to be a domain controller and run Exchange 2013 on it, and this is not recommended although it is supported...if you wanted to take the recommended approach you would also want to add an additional server (virtual or otherwise) to be a domain controller / Fileserver....add another server CAL for that.
0
 
Will SzymkowskiSenior Solution ArchitectCommented:
For 10 users, why not use Exchange 365? To have Exchange on-prem for 10 users seems expensive. However i will answer the questions you have asked below...
What do I need to have to be able to do the same things as the old 2008 server?
If you upgrade the OS then you need to upgrade Exchange, going to 2013 would be the best approach in this situation

Which version of Windows Server 2012? Essentials doesn't take in Exchange, however virtualization is possible?
Server Standard would be sufficient for this scenario, You could also us Hyper-V which will allow you to have 2 guest under the Host Operating system.

Should I just get a WS2012 Standard, even if I have less than 10 uers?
Anything more would be overkill for 10 users.

As for the Exchange, what should I do? If I upgrade OS to 2012, Exchange 2007 isn't compatible with WS2012. Do I upgrade the Exchange on the old server and then upgrade to WS2012? I'm at a loss here.
With Exchange 2007 there is an upgrade path to Exchange 2013. However you will need to bring up new servers to install the new Exchange 2013 on. You can use the Exchange Deployment Assistant link below for proper steps to migrated.

Exchange Deployment Assistant
https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/office/dn756393.aspx

Will.
0
 
Cliff GaliherCommented:
First, let's get a big hurdle out of the way. You won't be doing an in-place upgrade of any kind. Full stop. Regardless of which technology you buy, you must start thinking "migration" and abandon any thoughts of shortcutting with an in-place upgrade.

Second, if you need exchange, why buy old? SBS never allowed you to break apart its parts, so you don't have any exchange license now. Buying exchange 2007 this late in its life is a total waste.

So. If jt were me, I'd buy *at least* one copy of server 2012 R2, one copy of exchange 2013 and CALs. and virtualize. One VM running the essentials role. One VM running exchange, and VMs for LOB apps. Without more detailed planning, and a full needs and budget assessment, that's as good a starting place as any.
0
Making Bulk Changes to Active Directory

Watch this video to see how easy it is to make mass changes to Active Directory from an external text file without using complicated scripts.

 
martinlalancetteAuthor Commented:
Thank you all for your answers. I'm talking with the client about how to proceed and costs involved for the upgrade/migration. It should be done soon.
0
 
martinlalancetteAuthor Commented:
Alright then. The client chose to send all the Exchange to the cloud. All that's left to do is to is:

Backup everything.
Migrate Exchange to cloud
Uninstall Exchange
Upgrade to Windows Server 2012 Standard Edition

Does this look like a good order for this?
0
 
Cliff GaliherCommented:
You still won't be doing an upgrade. As I said above, you need to plan on migrating, not upgrading.  Uninstalling Exchange would be just one step in a proper migration plan.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.