What terms and insurance do I need to sell my software

Hi I have finally built an app I can sell but what licence agreement do I need them to agree and what insurance do I need. I just don't want to be sued on my first app if there is bugs etc
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taz8020Asked:
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pcelbaCommented:
The basic rule is: You are not selling the software but the license to use it. And users should agree to use the software "as is" without any obligations at your side... then you possibly don't need any insurance.

You may read any Microsoft license to obtain a picture about possible restrictions in use etc.

Also very good license ideas and terms are described in Creative Commons licensing. It is used for public domain primarily but to read it is a great licensing lesson:
https://wiki.creativecommons.org/Before_Licensing
https://creativecommons.org/choose/
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ElrondCTCommented:
Look at the licenses of multiple applications and vendors; pick and choose what best fits your sensibilities. Don't just rely on Microsoft, because they may not approach things the way you want to.

Below is the text in our software license that deals directly with warranty and liability. You may not want to have the first sentence; our software is intended to comply with externally imposed rules which are referenced there, but your software's purpose may be of a different nature.

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3.      Disclaimer of Warranty:  a. We have made every effort to ensure that <software> complies with <business requirements>.  However, you must be aware that this software is sold to you “as is,” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including but not limited to the implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for any particular purpose.  Notwithstanding anything herein to the contrary, <company> warrants that it owns the software and shall indemnify you against any claim by any third party for infringement of copyright, trademark, and/or proprietary interest rights of such third party to this software, to the extent attributable solely to <company>’s actions or omissions.
      b.  Like any other software product, we cannot guarantee that your use of this software will be uninterrupted or error-free.  We will attempt to correct any errors that you bring to our attention, but we cannot promise such corrections.  Some corrections may only be available as part of a major upgrade to the program which will be available at additional cost.
4.      Limitation of Liability:  <company> SHALL IN NO EVENT BE LIABLE FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, PUNITIVE, OR EXEMPLARY DAMAGES, WHETHER FORESEEABLE OR NOT AT THE TIME THIS AGREEMENT WAS ENTERED INTO, AND WHETHER OR NOT SUCH CLAIM FOR DAMAGES IS BASED UPON CONTRACT, TORT, PRODUCTS LIABILITY OR OTHER CAUSE FOR ACTION.  This includes, without limitation, damages due to loss of data, loss of business profits, business interruption or any other reason, even if <company> or its agent has been advised of the possibility of such damages.  <company>’s liability shall in no event exceed the amount you paid for this software.
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Assuming you're expecting a non-trivial amount of income from your software, I'd encourage you to talk to an intellectual property lawyer. You might want to prepare a draft license agreement and ask him to review it; that's probably going to be a lot cheaper than having him write it from scratch. It'll no doubt cost several hundred dollars, but think of it as your insurance premium; you may not need separate insurance to cover the software if the license is done right. Keep in mind that lawyers are paid to think of worst-case scenarios; you decide how far down the contingencies you want to go, and don't feel embarrassed to say, "Thank you for your advice; I'm not worried about that risk, and we don't need to pursue it further."
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