Veeam 8 Best Practices

For backup/replicating?

Based on us using local storage, no SAN.  A dedicated veeam server at out live site:

I assume a full backup weekly, and incrementals daily are a good idea?  If so, whats the difference between the 'create synthetic full backups periodically' and 'active full backup'?

Replications: what's the best options to take for replicating between the two locally hosted hosts?
We wont replicate to DR yet (over WAN).  So would a second veeam server be recommended for the remote/DR site?

Thanks
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CHI-LTDAsked:
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
I would recommend a dedicate Veeam Server, either physical or virtual.

Actually we do Full Backups, and then incremental.

I'm not going to cut and paste from the Veeam Help Centre

Active and Synthetic Full Backups

Synthetic Full Backup

Active Full Backup

As for Replication, that depends on your business, how old do you want the replicated VM to be 15 minutes, 60 minutes, 4 hours, or 24 hours, also it depends on your datastore and storage speed. BECAUSE

the VM, will be on a snapshot, whilst the replication is being done, which can cause performance issues in the VM, and VMs left on snapshots, and Snapshot Hell!!!!
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CHI-LTDAuthor Commented:
Do you break down the VM backups and Rep jobs individually or bundle the VMs together and set say 2-4 concurrent jobs to run?

snapshots!  grr.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
We actually group our Backups, e.g.

Domain Controllers
Exchange Servers
Virtual Infrastructure
Intranet
VDI
MAC Lab
Staff VMs
Student VMs
Development VMs

All our backups, run from 5pm - 7am, and we stagger each job, so they do not clash, or overlap.

and we have done this by trial and error, knowing how long each job approx takes.

Too many jobs at once, can cause VMs, Snapshots, and datastores to perform poorly.
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CHI-LTDAuthor Commented:
okay ta.
is the config backup settings the veeam server itself?
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
is the config backup settings the veeam server itself?

can you expand on this ?
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CHI-LTDAuthor Commented:
file - configuration backup - enable config backup options... encryption etc.
e.g. i thought i encrypted a backup with PW and it failed. i assume the config options need setting up?
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Yes, you will need to setup and config options required.

It might be worth you reading the manual on Veeam Backup and Replication!
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Alessandro ScafariaInfrastructure Premier Field AdministratorCommented:
I assume a full backup weekly, and incrementals daily are a good idea?  If so, whats the difference between the 'create synthetic full backups periodically' and 'active full backup'?
Andrew answered....
Replications: what's the best options to take for replicating between the two locally hosted hosts?
Andrew answered with a "real world" example.....(I really do basically the same in my company)....
I do backup during night and in chain I perform a replica locally in another host (just to be sure)....
We wont replicate to DR yet (over WAN).  So would a second veeam server be recommended for the remote/DR site?
It's not mandatory but you may ask yourself this question:

"What happens if your local LAN host fails completely? Obviously Veeam server will also fail at the same time and you will have no access to Veeam console to manage failover etc. how can we protect against this scenario?"

A "not written" best practice in Veeam (usually in small scenarios....your case...) is to create a replica of Veeam Server itself.....I suggest to create a Veeam Server replica in your local environment and another in your DR site......Your replica will work also even if all is crashed in the main site (with some IP address trick in order to adapt it in your DR environment)....you can simply power it on when you need it to...

Remember always that in Veeam you can TEST your replica and your backups in real time in order to be 100% sure that your "recovery infrastructure" is always ready to go when you need it:

http://helpcenter.veeam.com/backup/80/vsphere/recovery_verification.html

http://helpcenter.veeam.com/backup/80/vsphere/recovery_verification_surereplica.html
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CHI-LTDAuthor Commented:
our veeam box is physical.
also, once i run a full replication (takes as long as acronis) do following replicas use cbt?
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
All backups use CBT, if enabled!
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CHI-LTDAuthor Commented:
im talking replicas.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
backup, replicas, same technology.
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CHI-LTDAuthor Commented:
ok
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Alessandro ScafariaInfrastructure Premier Field AdministratorCommented:
our veeam box is physical.
Ok, but where do you put all your day-to-day backups? In this physical box too?
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CHI-LTDAuthor Commented:
no, a nas
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Alessandro ScafariaInfrastructure Premier Field AdministratorCommented:
Usually Veeam is installed in a physical machine when you need that Veeam might have a FC direct attach to your fast SAN....but you said that your scenario is all about local storage.....

I imagine instead that you put Veeam inside this physical box because this machine cannot be virtualized...(poor RAM/CPU requisited).......but if not.....perform a P2V into your ESXi host of Veeam Backup Server.....erase the box,  install vSphere there too and move again your Veeam Server VM.....but I'm guessing.....

If you can't do this above, you can "protect" your physical Veeam Server in two different ways:

1. With another great Veeam tool:

Veeam Endpoint Backup provides a free solution to backup your physical server (also clients) and use your Veeam Backup Repositories also for this purpose....

http://go.veeam.com/endpoint

But with this method you will have a downtime based on the time for you to restore the full backup of your physical machine (seems to be inconvenient).....

2. "Hybrid configuration"

Create a brand new VM in your ESXi host, install Veeam there and shut it down.....
Remember that Veeam can make a backup of its configuration files (configuration backup database in the Default Repository)......follow this guide to schedule a configuration backup job into your NAS repo.....

http://helpcenter.veeam.com/backup/80/vsphere/export_vbr_config.html

When your Physical Veeam machine is in trouble, you may power on your VM, perform a Veeam configuration restore in minutes.....

http://helpcenter.veeam.com/backup/80/vsphere/vbr_config_restore.html

And you will be fine!

I hope I was clear...
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CHI-LTDAuthor Commented:
after speaking with veeam tech, reverse incremental using application aware on backups seems best (yet to test recovery)
replication to remote site isn't going to work over slow link.  will stick to file level replication and database copies.  will test a replication of a test server to see if exchange can be done
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