I have 2 internet gateways at 1 school, want to utilize both using 2 routers but need to pass traffic from 1 network to the other? Also, re-addressing the network.

Hi.. my situation is: we have 2 subnets (172.16.0.1/20  & 172.16.16.1/20) with their respective gateway routers.. (ubiquiti edgerouter lite on both).  Both networks are working as they should (just re-addressed both subnets yesterday to allow more leases).  My goal is to route between these two networks to allow continuity throughout the school as we have static printers and a Server (DC) that would be nice to be able to connect to no matter which subnet they are on, they can utilize. On both of the edgerouter lites there is a 3rd ethernet port that could possibly be utilized to achieve this goal, but not sure.. I have read some scenarios that say to use a 3rd router to enable this functionality.  I am not opposed to Re-Address these networks again if that needs to happen.  If possible I would like to utilize the Server for DHCP & DNS, but think this isn't going to happen.. but not sure if adding a 2nd Network card could make it work properly.  I know this is alot.. I appreciate any responses. - Bill
William LarkinAsked:
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KimputerCommented:
Physically connect both routers (network switch, preferably both routers need to be close to each other, or within safe networking distance, say 100m). The only thing you need is to add a static route to both routers (pointing to each other). That way, the network behaves EXACTLY like it did before (each their own DHCP, DNS, internet etc), but still can communicate with each other (preferably on a second network interface on the router, otherwise DHCP request might travel over this line, and hence still some PC's on one side gets DHCP info from the other side)

If distance is a problem, then a leased line or VPN is the only way.
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KimputerCommented:
Physically have these networks connected through switches, have the mask open (255.255.0.0), and you're already on the way. Because the networks are now connected, you have to have one DHCP server which you need to configure probably based on MAC addresses (takes a lot of work though, record all MAC addresses, and assign their configurations).
After that, to have both the bandwidth of both routers, you need to add a DUAL WAN router before it (the whole LAN connects to this DUAL WAN router, and the router connects to the two working routers).
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William LarkinAuthor Commented:
Thank you Kimputer for your response.. I wasn't very clear in my question  (I apologize)  Essentially I have 2 separate networks right now (same school).. Both have their own Internet gateway routers, dhcp and dns servers (which are all provided functions of their respective routers).  What I'm wanting to do is (if possible) have each of these networks somehow pass traffic back and forth, but maintain their own separate Internet connections. Basically separate networks that can communicate. Kinda sounds like maybe I need a  VPN connection or something like that. Anyway, Thanks for your posting.
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William LarkinAuthor Commented:
Thanks again.. Let me ask you this.. Each router has a third port that can be configured however.. (the ports I have are ETH0:LAN,  ETH1:WAN, ETH2:UNASSIGNED) Would it be possible for me to connect the two together using this port? Btw, the routers are 3 feet apart. Thanks. Bill
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William LarkinAuthor Commented:
I'm kinda novice at routes and configuring them, but I do understand them in concept.
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William LarkinAuthor Commented:
Thank you for your responses.. You were most helpful.
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