VMWare tools on Linux Mint 17.1

Hi all,

Does anyone have Linux Mint 17.1 specific instructions on how to install VMware Tools?

I'm running Workstation 10, and when i installed Mint 17.1, i specified Ubuntu x64 as the guest OS.

I was able to do the command lines to actually install the Tools, but i just want to make sure I did it the right way. I can't say with certainty whether i installed the right tools package, etc.

Thanks in advance.
Go-BruinsAsked:
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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Here is the screen grab of the CD contents when i try to run the VMWare install procedure:

a
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
see my EE Article, although this is for VMware vSphere, the only difference, is how it's "mounted", the in OS install is the same.

Part 9: HOW TO: Install VMware Tools for Linux on a VMware Linux virtual machine on a VMware vSphere Hypervisor 5.1 (ESXi 5.1) Host Server

my Article is based on Ubuntu, which Mint is based on!
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rindiCommented:
Vmware Tools is included with many Linux Distro's in their repositories. The easiest way to install them would be to use that. In Mint they are included. Open Synaptic Package Manager and enter vmware in the quick Filter. Open-vm-tools-desktop would be what you'd select for installation.
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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Thank you. I was able to implement both ways.
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rindiCommented:
You only need to use one way. The advantage of using the repository is that you'll get updates automatically when you update the system. If you do it manually through the mounted CD image, you have to repeat that action every time new tools get available (usually with updates to VMware Workstation).
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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Yes, I tried both ways just to get some insight. I might want to play with other distros like Debian, Ubuntu, etc.

Are the installs on those distros similar?
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
If based on Ubuntu, make sure you use a supported Linux version!
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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Thank you. I don't mind learning a new OS (and the command lines), but the thing that drives me crazy about Linux are all the crazy versions, even among the distros. What I eventually want to do is test a web server, and from my research, I've been told that Debian would be a good platform. But when I try to download it, there are something like 5 .iso's to choose from, and very little documentation.

Oh well, I guess I have to roll up my sleeves and plow through them all.
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rindiCommented:
Ubuntu should be the same as Linux Mint, as it is based on ubuntu and uses largely the same repo's. On Debian based Distro's Vmware tools are also included in the Repo's, and they use the same package manager as Ubuntu does (actually Ubuntu is based on Debian), so also there you'd use the same procedure.

If you were using VirtualBox, many distro's even include the tools out of the box, if the distro recognizes you are using VirtualBox, the VirtualBox driver are loaded automatically and you don't have to install them separately (ubuntu is an exception here and doesn't load them). This might also be true for VMware, but I haven't checked that.
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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Thank you all. I'm learning more and more every day, thanks to kind folks like you who don't mind sharing.
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rindiCommented:
Personally I don't do webservers, but maybe Turnkey is a good option for you. It is based on Debian, and uses a module type of setup, where you install those modules that you need for your tasks. From what I heard it isn't hard to get going:

http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=turnkey
http://www.turnkeylinux.org/
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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Thanks much!
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