Migrate server2008 R2 server to new hardware

I recently asked a question about cloning a failing Windows 2008 R2 server onto new, identical hardware, and was given the good advice not to attempt to clone it since it's a domain controller. Now that I've identified the correct method to remove the server, I need some advice on how to best conduct the migration. I need to migrate the following:

Approximately 300 user "home" folders.
Multiple shares with complex security assignments.
All FSMO roles (This was the fist DC, and has all of the primary roles)
DNS
DHCP
Multiple Access database with the UNC path of the server hard coded.

I'm hoping to avoid recreating all the shares and security along with manually identifying and modifying all the user account home folder assignment.

Is there a migration tool available that works reliably? Can it be tested before rolling the dice in a production environment?

Out of everything I listed, DHCP is the only role I'm comfortable moving (done it several times previously). DNS has caused me some hangups in the past. I've had to transfer the FSMO roles before but don't recall the exact procedure. I assume that I can copy the shares from one server to the other and retain the security settings. It would be wonderful if there is a way to filter the active directory user accounts with a home folder on the server to be replaced and then update every account with a new home path of "\\NEWSERVERNAME\USER\%USERNAME%" and be done. The Access databases could be all manually altered, but it would be so much easier if I could just leave a DNS alias to the old server name. I assume there is no way possible to retain the old server name after migration?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
Brook_LaneAsked:
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Assuming your existing server license is NOT an OEM license you can move it.  With 300 user home folders, I would assume you have more than one server and more than one DC.  So, I would demote this server, P2V the system as a NON-DC, and run it as a Virtual Machine on the new server using the free Hyper-V 2012 Server installed on the new server.

If this was a VM in the first place, this would be EASY to remedy.  VERY EASY.  Given that it's not, things will be considerably more difficult.
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Brook_LaneAuthor Commented:
We don't currently run any virtual systems at our company, and no one on staff is at all familiar with VM. I consider that too risky for something being done in a near-emergency situation. Certainly I see the value moving forward, but this isn't the time to take the plunge.
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Brook_LaneAuthor Commented:
Thinking through the last response a little further, I can see value in transferring the DC roles to a new system, after which I suppose I could just clone the demoted server to new hardware (if I had yet another server, which sadly I do not). I may consider that as an option if I can get my hands on the hardware quickly, to avoid having to virtualize without thorough testing upfront.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Virtualization is not new technology.  Windows has had it built in since 2008 and VMWare has been around more than a decade.  It's done ALMOST EVERYWHERE.  You/your company need to get with this technology - you can see it's already putting you in a bad position not being prepared to use it.  You can dislike me for my opinion on this, but I think you'll find most people agree with it.

Since you're stuck in the physical world, (re)move the DC functionality and migrate to new/different hardware as soon as possible.  If your server is failing, then ANYTHING is better - you could use a desktop.  The registry export holds true even in this case for share permissions but for NTFS permissions, you COULD use XCOPY or ROBOCOPY - or setup a DFS.  Or perform a full backup and a restore (the net effect simulates a failed server so you can test that your backups are working as expected and ACTUALLY RUN THROUGH the restoration process should it be needed without completely downing the existing server in advance (remember you're restoring the DATA not the OS!).
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WORKS2011Austin Tech CompanyCommented:
I recently asked a question about cloning a failing Windows 2008 R2 server onto new, identical hardware, and was given the good advice not to attempt to clone it since it's a domain controller.
Why not create an image and move it over to a new device? I've done this with 500 users plus and had no problems.

Is there a migration tool available that works reliably? Can it be tested before rolling the dice in a production environment?
StorageCraft my favorite and you can test in a VM prior or to the new hardware.
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