Do I need this many servers? Upgrade help - Advice needed

I recently got transferred to a new place, they have about 60 users and one tower server which serves the following:
-AD DC
-DNS
-File Server
-SQL/Application server for attendance management

Only a handful of users log into the domain and aside from attendance management everything about the setup seems disposable. Thus, I am intending to change things up a bit by getting the following:
-42u Rack

-UPS

-Dell r220 x2
*DC DNS  x2

-Dell r730 /
*Hyper-V
**Antivirus Server
**File Server/WSUS
**SQL Server
**LAMP Server

I am planning to get another r730 with a storage unit after a while to attempt clustering my VMs.
Is the listed new setup sound for the roles I listed? What would you change and why?
ImmbahAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
Will SzymkowskiSenior Solution ArchitectCommented:
Everything looks good from what I can see. However you did not provide the specs of the machines that will be in place for the new setup.

Have the DC/DNS on its own server would be best. Also making sure that you have enough RAM/CPU allocated for all of the VM's that you will be hosting on the second server.

Just remember SQL chews up a lot of RAM so make sure that you have properly allocated resources accordingly.

Aside from that everything looks good.

Will.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
What you've configured is fine... but you'll need 2 copies of Windows Server assigned to each Hyper-V host if you intend to cluster the VMs so they can fail over.

Honestly, I might do things differently.  But it depends on the requirements of your business.  For example, consider:

*You only have 60 users and the domain is lightly used.
*Why two physical DCs?   Why not ONE physical DC and one VM?
*Why not combine the Antivirus software and the File/WSUS server?  Separation of functions is great for a more "uninterruptible" environment - reboot the AV server without affecting the file server... but is that worth the $1000 in terms of a license and added hardware to support the VM?  I can't answer that for you - you have to... but in most environments, I would say it's not worth the month to have the added VM and management resources dedicated to it.

I can't tell you what you need as I don't know your business or environment... but you should be looking at what makes practical and financial sense and keep in mind, every server run also costs money to maintain...
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andyalderCommented:
The whole setup works happily on a single tower server at the moment but you're proposing to replace that with 3 servers plus shared storage?
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
why fix what isn't broken? What perceived problem are you trying to eliminate?
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andyalderCommented:
He's buying himself a job by throwing tonnes of kit at something that isn't broken.

Question "Do I need this many servers?"

Answer - "NO" - unless you are trying to  buy yourself a job by complicating it. Probably trained by hancocka.
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ImmbahAuthor Commented:
Will Szymkowski
current tower server:
T310
4GB RAM
1TB HD
Xeon3400

Ones I am intending to get:
r220
e3-1220
8GB RAM
2 1TB

r730
Dual Xeon E5-2609
64 GB RAM
3x 600GB 15k SAS


Lee W, MVP
How would you do it?

* Everyone should be joined and not just a handful, it wouldn’t be used lightly if this was true. The whole thing has been neglected, hence why I said disposable. The current server still has less than 60 days of a 3 years warranty and for the most part of that period it operated without AV or backups. The client machines are even worse, some with non-genuine OSs and loads of viruses, malware and adware..
* You make a good point. I thought about either both VMs or physical, but not a mix.
* Our organization is a part of a bigger one and to satisfy the current agreement of the AV vendor, a standalone server (physical or virtual) with at least 8 GB of RAM must be provided.  


andyalder:
For availability and scalability.
I am really sorry for not elaborating more but I have a tendency to say less and less whenever the situation is negative, or as dire as it is in my new workplace. That said, how am I complicating it by merely wanting redundancy and role separation? It surely works now but if it fails I am left with none.
Whats a hanckoka?

David Johnson:
Because it will eventually break. Future Problems that will arise from having everything on one machine.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
You asked me specifically:
How would you do it?

But I posted before:
I can't tell you what you need as I don't know your business or environment... but you should be looking at what makes practical and financial sense and keep in mind, every server run also costs money to maintain...

It is good that you want to ensure the servers are under warranty... but that doesn't mean you need multiple servers.  What the load like on your existing servers... if you cannot determine what is best for your environment, HIRE SOMEONE to come in and look at what you do and what you need.  I sometimes give broad advice and make some recommendations, but really, the most reliable, best approach is always to allow a consultant (or other professional) to get an understanding of your business and work with you to determine the best solution... not just put out a few ideas which may sound good and work for 90% of the businesses out there... but be missing someone critical because we weren't given the opportunity to learn what your business does, how it works, and what does and does not make sense.
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Seth SimmonsSr. Systems AdministratorCommented:
This question has been classified as abandoned and is closed as part of the Cleanup Program. See the recommendation for more details.
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