What is the latest good lightning protection for a network?

Our server currently runs WinSBS2003 which we plan to upgrade soon.  It manages the clients, the file server, and the DNS server.  We have a wireless router and an additional AP and also a Cisco switch.  We have about 25 clients.  What would be appropriate effective equipment for protecting our system from lightning damage caused by a strike which comes through the ethernet?
Josh ChristieAsked:
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Mohammed KhawajaManager - Infrastructure:  Information TechnologyCommented:
Look at this solution:

http://www.l-com.com/surge-protector-cat6-data-line-lightning-surge-protectors
https://www.ubnt.com/accessories/ethernet-surge-protector/

Also note that every time, you use a solution like this, you are running a risk or deteriorating ethernet signal.
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Josh ChristieAuthor Commented:
I see that these protector units are in series relative to the ethernet signal.  I assume that the power rating they mention refers to the power of the equipment being served by the ethernet cabling, NOT the power of the lightning strike.  This did not seem to me to be clear in the documentation.  But maybe they thought the answer to that was obvious.  So how do I determine the power draw of an ethernet load?  The power draw on the line voltage is easy... the specs of the equipment will indicate its power, or at worst I could put an ammeter in one side of the line.  But the ethernet is using 8 lines of high frequency.  How do I know the power rating?  

And here is a more practical question... could I buy one of these units and put it, say, between the modem and the router and thus give protection to the entire system using one protection unit?  Or does each device in my network, like the client computers, need one of the protectors?
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Mohammed KhawajaManager - Infrastructure:  Information TechnologyCommented:
You could put it between the modem and the router, however, you have to put the device between the equipment which surge from the lightning could come from and the devices it attaches to.  Most modems today use fiber which means they are not susceptible to lightning, etc.  These device I mentioned are for equipment that is placed outside where lightning surge could come from.  If you are really worried about surge then you should have UPS/surge protection for all your networking as they could be affected by power surge coming from the AC outlets.
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Josh ChristieAuthor Commented:
Yes, we already have some power surge equipment for in the AC line and we plan to get more.  So we are caring for that part of the picture.  We recently had a lightning strike which did considerable damage.  Evidence shows that damaging strike came from both the AC line and also the phone/ethernet.  OK.  Our internet signal comes via a standard telephone cable, not fibreoptic.  There was some lightning protection on the incoming phone line.  Even so, there was damage to some of the phone equipment.  And perhaps the other damage that we experienced in the network may have come from that source.  Our ethernet switch blew.  

What about my power question?
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Mohammed KhawajaManager - Infrastructure:  Information TechnologyCommented:
Sorry, I don't know the answer to your power question.  Take a look at this article as I had it bookmarked a long time ago:

http://www.ti.com/lit/an/snla089b/snla089b.pdf
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Josh ChristieAuthor Commented:
OK, well, in the URL you gave me earlier...

http://www.l-com.com/surge-protector-cat6-data-line-lightning-surge-protectors

What exactly do they mean by Power Rating, and how is the consumer intended to use that information in selecting a product to purchase?
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Josh ChristieAuthor Commented:
This sounds like some good advice, but I have not actually tested it.
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