PC assigning IP range

I have a WiFi router I want to connect to a LAN port of an existing FIOS router to extend my WiFi range.  It appears the new router initially requires its address to be 192.168.0.1.  My FIOS router can't do that.  I believe a Windows computer, using ICS or something, can assign IP addresses to a device that is plugged into the 2nd NIC.

What do I do in Windows to make it supply DHCP with a specific range to the 2nd NIC?
IBMJunkmanAsked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
I think you want to connect your new router to your network (based on what you said).

Hook up a LAN port on the new router to a LAN port on your existing router.

Hook up a computer to the new router and use a web browser to access 192.168.0.1. See if you can do that. You may need to set a static IP on your PC temporary so it gets an address. It might work with the web browser.

Once you have the web management screen for the new router, give it a LAN static IP address on your existing router.

Now turn DHCP OFF on the new router.

That should do what you wish.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
IBMJunkmanAuthor Commented:
That worked.  Set the WAN to be DHCP and the FIOS router made it 192.168.1.2.  The new router as an entry that is the address used to get into the setup screen.  I can't make it anything in 192.168.1.x   If I make it 192.168.2.250 I can get into setup via the PC attached to the router.  But not from the main PC attached to the FIOS router.
0
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
If you want the new router to be on a different subnet than the main router (so you cannot connect devices between the two routers) then try the following:

Hook up the WAN port of the new router to a LAN port on the network.

Leave DHCP turned ON for the new router.

Set the new router DHCP range to be 192.168.2.100-200 or something like that.

When you do as above or do as you did in your post and give the new router a different subnet, you effectively disconnect the routers from each other. This is normal.
0
Determine the Perfect Price for Your IT Services

Do you wonder if your IT business is truly profitable or if you should raise your prices? Learn how to calculate your overhead burden with our free interactive tool and use it to determine the right price for your IT services. Download your free eBook now!

IBMJunkmanAuthor Commented:
OK, started over.  FIOS LAN port to new router LAN port. 2nd PC to new router LAN. Got into admin screen at 192.168.0.1 using 2nd PC attached to new router.  Set admin page address to 192.168.1.251. Rebooted and re-entered admin page using 192.168.1.251.  WAN is set to DHCP.  Disconnected LAN cable between new and FIOS router.  Entered admin on FIOS router using 1st PC and set a static IP of 192.168.1.251 using the MAC of the new router.  Connect FIOS LAN port to new router WAN port. Using 2nd PC enter admin page of new router using 192.168.1.251 and box pops saying conflict and changes admin page address to 192.168.2.251.  Reboots and I can access at 192.168.2.251 using 2nd PC.

1st PC cannot access new router admin using 192.168.1.251 or 192.168.2.251.  Does reply to ping on 192.168.1.251, not 2.251.

It seems this router cannot have its admin page (LAN) address to be on the same N.N.N as its IP address.
0
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
In order to have two subnets, your main router needs to do VLAN's which I do not think it does. Your two subnets are separate and so you cannot work between them.

I keep my routers on the same subnet (and of course, I can manage from anywhere). Why do you need two subnets?
0
IBMJunkmanAuthor Commented:
If by subnets you mean 192.168.1 vs 192.168.2 I don't.  Seems this device will not allow the WAN address to be the same subnet as the DHCP addresses it supplies.  It changed the 192.168.1.251 LAN address to 192.168.2.251 when it saw the WAN was 192.168.1.251.

I solved the problem I was trying to fix by using a -9db antenna on the Wireless AP the furthest cam uses. So I don't need this $30 router.
0
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Subnets ARE 192.168.2.x and 192.168.1.x . Those are subnets by definition and making them different is what is causing you issues.

If you do not need the extra router, fine. My first post was how to set it up on the same subnet and, course, that works.

I think your confusion was over the proper use of subnets.
0
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
@IBMJunkman  - Thanks and I was happy to help.  Good luck with your setup.
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Networking

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.