Scrum Planning

Anthony Lucia
Anthony Lucia used Ask the Experts™
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I was looking at this site explaining Scrum Burn-down charts

https://www.scrumalliance.org/community/articles/2013/august/burn-down-chart-%E2%80%93-an-effective-planning-and-tracki

What caught my eye was the following:

Sprint Duration – 2 weeks 
Team Size       - 7 
Hours/Day       – 6 
Total Capacity  – 420 hours

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So the total hours per day during being used in this example is six,, not eight.

Is that normative for planning purposes.

Would the six hours per day include daily sprints, sprint reviews, sprint retrospectives, etc.

Thanks
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I don't think this is a formal definition but a fact.

You can expect your team to work 8 hours a day every day of every week in your project.

Reality is that people has other activities (phone calls, meetings, lunch and so on) and hours worked per day are not 8.

You have to learn or meassure your teams effective hours worked per day.

I can suggest this article about the topic:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20131212124121-20017018-the-8-hour-workday-doesn-t-really-work
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Commented:
Yes that is normal and a very usefully way for more accurate planning when you're using hours. That time adds up fast! The x/hrs day should be calculated to equal development time, and exclude all meetings and admin tasks.
Your exact time in meetings might be different so it'd be worthwhile to do a quick calculation and use the most accurate number for your team.

It's been said that at most, even from highly productive and motivated employees, you can expect the average 6 hours of work each day.

However I recommend using story points or task count on burndowns. While hours remaining might be useful in some circumstances I would not measure a team with time spent. Instead use what really matters, delivered work.

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