Would installing a switch significantly increase the network speed?

We have a computer about 250' away from the server room. Do you think we should install a giga bit switch at about 200' and then route the cable from the switch to the computer, instead of routing a cable from the server room to the computer without the switch? Would installing with the switch significantly increase the network speed, as compared to without?
CastlewoodAsked:
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saam117Commented:
If we have the same infrastructure, it won't change anything. I mean if you now have a direct CAT5 and will install a switch with a CAT5 and then a Patch Cord which is also CAT5, no change at all. Basically you just added a hop on the network.

You would have "speed" improvement if you upgrade your cable technology or ran a Fiber connection to the switch and a Cooper from switch to computer.

Even if you've done so the improvement you would see (as an end user) is very little. Now if it for servers as you mentioned on the enunciate then you would see significant time reduce in data transmission from server to computer.

I hope I could help. This is the Commscope website for cooper solutions in case additional information is needed: http://www.commscope.com/Product-Catalog/Enterprise/Product/Copper/

BR,
Sidney Andrino
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Bryant SchaperCommented:
I would not expect any improvement, unless the cable is bad, CAT5 is certified for 300ft.  Gigabit could help if you max bandwidth
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Have you been experiencing performance problems?

I think Bryant simply made a typo - Cat5E is required for gigabit links but as stated, so long as you stay within the 100 meter (328 Foot) range, you likely won't see measurable differences unless that cable is experiencing some kind of electrical interference - in which case, a switch probably wouldn't help much... you'd need shielded Cat5E or better cabling.
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CastlewoodAuthor Commented:
Ours is gigabit LAN and CAT6 cables all the way. Do you think CAT6 will perform better than 100 meters?
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saam117Commented:
Hi my friend.

CAT5, 5e, and CAT6 are only certified in below 100 meters range. The cooper cabling standards requires a cable shorter than 100 meters or else the cable might not be certified and might also lose packets/data.

BR,
Sidney Andrino
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Are you having performance problems?  So long as your cabling run IN TOTAL is under 100 Meters (including patch cables) then a 5e cable will perform essentially the same as a 6 or 7 cable at gigabit speeds.  If you are having performance issues, you should detail what is happening and ask a question about that - there are many possible reasons for data not transferring at full gigabit speeds
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jmcgOwnerCommented:
A CAT6 cable run the entire 250 feet should be your first choice. Adding any sort of switch in the middle will reduce performance (perhaps imperceptably) and add another point of potential failure for troubleshooting.
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Bryant SchaperCommented:
from experience, you could get better than 300ft, but be outside spec.

6 is fine, and the overall spec is for 100 meters, assuming 90 meters of solid core wiring in the wall, and 2 5m patch cables on each end.  that is what the spec says for CAT5e+

If the exising cable is not having a problem, a switch will not help.  Have you cabling vendor come out and test it or certify if possible.  Your switch can help too, do you use a cisco, and can you do a show interface for that interface, Juniper or HP have a similar command
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CastlewoodAuthor Commented:
We are planning for the cable run so no, don't have the performance issue yet.
What you guys answered did surprise me is you guys seem not to agree a switch can be used as repeater to boost the maximum length.
I was/have been told that a repeater can be placed in say 250' and as such you can max the length to say 500'. And a switch can be a repeater for that purpose. Can you clarify if it is the case or not??
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jmcgOwnerCommented:
You could put a router in there, but not a switch. Ethernet depends on a certain limit on end-to-end distance because of the need to reliably detect collisions.
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CastlewoodAuthor Commented:
My question probably didn't state clearly. The original question is more like:
There is about 400' between the server and the client computer. If we run a CAT6 between, there won't be enough signal strength. To sort this issue out, we would need to install a switch between, probably in the meddle. Then the signal will be strong enough.
Again, a switch can be used as a repeater.
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jmcgOwnerCommented:
That's quite a restatement of the original question.

And I'll make my own restatement. For a distance of 400 feet, you would need to insert a switch or router to break up the length so it does not exceed 100 meters. A repeater or hub would not separate the two network segments into different collision domains, but a switch or router would. It will also provide the signal regeneration you were concerned about for the long cable run.
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CastlewoodAuthor Commented:
Thank you much. That's clear now.
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