need a powershell script to send an email to the user added to a security group in AD

can someone provide a powershell script that will generate an email to the user that is added to a security group in Active Directory.

i.e. john smith is added to ADSecGroup and an email is auto-generated to the user that was added to the group.

thx in advance.
siber1Asked:
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Phil DavidsonCommented:
The automated nature of invoking the request will require numerous adjustments.  I don't have a Development QA server at my disposal.  But I will refer you to this link which should help you get started:

https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Monitor-Active-Directory-4c4e04c7
siber1Author Commented:
thx but I have already seen that link, the key here is to have the users that are added to the group to receive the automated email. if anyone else has a way to do this, look forward to hearing our solution.
sirbountyCommented:
You won't be able to monitor AD changes in the same way you'd monitor file system changes, however here are a few ideas:

1. Enable auditing, and set a SACL on that group for write access. Events are recorded in the security logs, and you periodically check for the related event.

2. Record a snapshot of members, then periodically check the membership, comparing to your last snapshot.

3. Limit access for adding users to a select account. Develop an interface which runs under an admin-level account to perform the add, then have said application submit your email.

http://blogs.technet.com/b/heyscriptingguy/archive/2010/12/07/use-powershell-to-monitor-and-respond-to-events-on-your-server.aspx is a good source for the first option.
http://blogs.technet.com/b/ashleymcglone/archive/2014/12/17/forensics-monitor-active-directory-privileged-groups-with-powershell.aspx could be tweaked for the second.
The third would be a good bit more design and involvement, and most don't want to limit their environment this way.

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siber1Author Commented:
thanks I'll try that approach.
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