how to install a wireless router in a corporate laptop environment

our office has all laptops and they connect through wireless.  

there is a dhcp server on the subnet to give out ip addresses to the new laptops and the old desktops ( almost all the desktops are gone ).

How do I handle dhcp on the nat router ?  Now it is taking one of the good ip addresses and giving out 192.168.1.x ip addresses.  

Can a wireless router ( nighthawk 6 netgear router ) deal with it not being the dhcp server ?  How do I take care of that.

windows laptops
TIMFOX123Asked:
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Peter HartCommented:
in the setup of the netgear router you are adding turn off the DHCP server.
chapter 11 of the best up guide here: http://www.downloads.netgear.com/files/GDC/R8000/R8000_UM_8Jul14.pdf

and don't use the Internet connection to connect it to the network, just plug a cable into one of there LAN ports to your network.
as you don't want a router you need a wireless switch

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TIMFOX123Author Commented:
Hey that makes sense

thx
CompProbSolvCommented:
Just a minor point to add (chilternPC has sent you on the right path).  Configure the LAN side of the Netgear router to have an IP address that is on the same subnet as your main router.  You can set the WAN side to use DHCP or a static IP that is on a private subnet that is not being used (e.g. if you are a 192.168.1.x network, configure the WAN port to be 192.168.2.1).  You won't have a physical connection to it, so it doesn't matter as long as it doesn't conflict with anything in use.
TIMFOX123Author Commented:
I've requested that this question be closed as follows:

Accepted answer: 250 points for chilternPC's comment #a40768245
Assisted answer: 0 points for TIMFOX123's comment #a40768396
Assisted answer: 250 points for CompProbSolv's comment #a40769761

for the following reason:

great job  thx
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