PHotoshop "clone"?

Photoshop allows you to "layer" images. Is there a free application that does this?
RaiderNationDelegateAsked:
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Zephyr ICTCloud ArchitectCommented:
Two off the top of my head:

Paint.NET

GIMP

For Windows, and if you don't require all the in-depth features I very much like Paint.NET, GIMP is a great Photoshop replacement coming from the OpenSource world, but works fine on Windows as well.
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
I have GIMP on most of my machines also.
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rindiCommented:
As mentioned, The Gimp is the best. It runs on Linux, and if it has to be Windows, then I always recommend portableapps versions of any software, and The Gimp is available as such:

http://portableapps.com/download

http://portableapps.com/apps/graphics_pictures/gimp_portable
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jmpg_70Commented:
With the subscription service for Adobe products currently so cheap why bother with anything else. Photoshop is at the professionals choice for a reason. Fair enough GIMP et al., all do Photoshop type stuff, it isn't quite the same.
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SStoryCommented:
http://www.sumopaint.com/home/

I agree  that Photoshop is THE BEST. However, without Wine it won't work on Linux and maybe other systems. It depends on what OS the OP has.

Gimp is pretty powerful, but I am just not as used to it.
There is a blog on how to use Gimp more like Photoshop:
http://lifehacker.com/how-to-make-the-gimp-work-more-like-photoshop-1551318983
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rindiCommented:
Subscription in my point of view is not cheap at all. You have to pay continuously if you want to keep on using the product, so in the end you pay far more than if you bought the product in the first place.

Besides that, The GIMP in my point of view is the "Original", and photoshop just a "clone"!
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jmpg_70Commented:
I  am being a pedant

Besides that, The GIMP in my point of view is the "Original", and photoshop just a "clone"!

Thomas Knoll wrote the first code for in 1988 and Photoshop was release in 1990 and was a blessing to anyone who had to pay for scanning and image correction prior to that. I think GIMP didn't come out for many years after that.

As to the price/cost of software. The cost versus the value is always the question you have to ask yourself. I was resentful that adobe brought in the subscription service for CC, but when you consider the full subscription cost per month gives you access to soon much PROFESSIONAL level software at a commercial level then I would say it is cheap. I need it  I buy it. Gimp is free, written by enthusiastic professional and amateur coders and doesn't cost anything…

until you have to work commercially. I can do something in Photoshop in five minutes charge my client for the time and be ethical about it.Or I could use GIMP take two hours to learn how to do the Photoshop like task correctly, lose two hours of work art $100.00 per hour and ethically couldn't charge the client. Thats not cheap or free its bad business. So if you work for yourself Photoshop is cheap, if you use GIMP working for someone else ethically are you ripping the employer off.

When you do imaging or design for yourself as a hobby GIMP is a good option if you want to be a "HACKER" ( in the most respectful 1980's respect for computer hackers) using community based freeware/shareware. But Photoshop is still the KING...

BTW I am not sponsored or paid by Adobe and have used Corel, paint etc etc, to do commercial work and in the end the default is Adobe as it is the best software for some many reasons, despite the EVIL empire conspiracy mistrust so many people display towards Adobe.

Flame me if you will, I will have gone home and earned my pay and you will still be twidling with GIMP.
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rindiCommented:
I don't see the ethical difference between using an OpenSource, free product or a closed source, not free product as your tool, and charging your customers.

Besides, it's up to you to support the OpenSource community with donations or your own code to improve the product. If you are used to using The Gimp you probably also have to waste 2 or more hours to learn how to use photoshop, while you could have done the same thing with The Gimp in 2 minutes.
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
I use both.
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jmpg_70Commented:
I use both.

Good call Dave
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SStoryCommented:
I agree that subscription models stink. However they do avoid yearly upgrade costs to get new versions. Yes you do wind up paying more, but no all in one lump.  That could be a plus for someone, especially professionals getting paid a lot to use the product.  Having started with Photoshop, going to Gimp hasn't been worth learning to me. However it does look very powerful and I have played with it on more than one occasion. For the average Joe it is probably good enough, but I agree that Photoshop is king in this realm.  

There is also Autodesk Pixlr, Paintshop Pro. There is also the Gimpshop (http://www.gimpshop.com/), Gimp presented like Photoshop for Photoshop users.
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jmpg_70Commented:
In terms of the cost of CC subscription I sat down with my accountant recently to work through some finance issues with my business, including financing software.

My previous model of software usage has been to update every two years with upgrade cycles so cs4.0 to cs5.0 etc. the cost for the upgrade was about $1500.00 for Master Suite. For about $400.00 I can pay for twelve months subscription upfront so, so over two years $800. So averaged the cost — for me at least — is cheaper and I get access to nearly twice as much software and frequent updates (that mostly improve the software). This option is far cheaper in reality than the previous model I undertook.

For digital imaging Photoshop is (mostly) the primary professional option, however in my practice I use Graphic Converter for some tasks that Photoshop can't do, such as opening corrupt image files. Aperture is used for mass image correction and DAM (although I may convert to lightroom). GIMP doesn't get a look in. However I have friends that are digital artist that use a suite of coded plugins for GIMP to produce a variety of procedural effects via scripting and the like that photoshop can't.
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Selena JainGraphics DesignerCommented:
I use GIMP
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