Access 2007 vs Access 2013

If a user has Access 2007 loaded on their computer but is trying to run an Access database written in 2013, can they load the Access 2013 runtime file on their computer and then will the Access 2013 database open and run just fine?

--Steve
SteveL13Asked:
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Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
Theoretically yes,
(Note that there is a lot about this setup that we do not know..., for example you stated the version but not the specific db format, ....mdb, .accdb )
There have been some issue reported when you install a run-time and the full version, on the same machine (especially if they are for different Access versions)

Can we ask why the Access 2007 user cannot run the 2013 file directly?

VM (Virtual Machine) is becoming a popular options when these types of situations are present...

...but let's see what other Experts may contribute...
;-)

JeffCoachman
SteveL13Author Commented:
The file format is .accdb

"Can we ask why the Access 2007 user cannot run the 2013 file directly?"  -  Apparently there is a compatibility issue but I don't know what it is.
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
As Jeff alludes to, you should NOT run both the Retail version of 2007, and the Runtime version of 2013, concurrently. You'll have nothing but trouble, and your end user will spin up voodoo spells to plague your life :)

You would be well advised to determine the "compatibility issue" and resolve that.
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SteveL13Author Commented:
Great advise!  But what are the differences between 2007 and 2013?  How would I go about making the d/b work on a 2007 computer?
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
There are quite a lot of differences, and 2013 has proven to be notoriously finicky in this regard. Here's an MSDN article about it:

https://support.office.com/en-za/article/Discontinued-features-and-modified-functionality-in-Access-2013-bc006fc3-5b48-499e-8c7d-9a2dfef68e2f

If you need to support multiple users, you should develop the application using the "lowest common denominator" method - which means you should be doing dev work in 2007, not 2013. You should also be very careful of your References. Access does a pretty good job of "upsizing" referenced (like from Outlook 9 to Outlook 10), but cannot downsize them at all.
Nick67Commented:
If a user has Access 2007 loaded on their computer but is trying to run an Access database written in 2013,
The VBA references do NOT downgrade automagically
The references to MS Access 14.0 Object Library will not become MS Access 12.0 Object Library by themselves, and you cannot do that programmatically.  But that is easily fixed.
Now, bopping a single file back and forth between users on different versions, it will need fixing each version change.
But then, any multi-user Access file should be split between a back-end and front-end, and the front-end distributed to each local hard drive.
Each time a update to the front-end is pushed out, the Access 2007 file will need the references fixed.
Doable.

A2007+ created objects rapidly become corrupt if design changes are made in A2003.
I don't know if that is a problem with A2103 to A2007.
I suspect it won't be, but still, do any design changes in A2013, the version where the file was created.  Or Open Access 2007 and import all the objects to a new file, and then do all development in A2007 from that point forward.

You'll have nothing but trouble, and your end user will spin up voodoo spells to plague your life :)
+1
A single version of Office per machine (or per VM) unless you have truly compelling reasons is the way to go.
You can run multiple versions if you are careful, vigilant and lucky -- but it can be a PITA
Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
"lowest common denominator" method
To this day, I still develop mostly in Access 2007/.mdb
I will submit sample databases in this format as well, ...unless the OP is using .accdb (then I will use Access 2007.accdb only)

Steve, can you clarify something for us...?
Is this an app you developed, ...or is this just a question someone asked you?
    "Hey, I have Acc 2007 and I am having trouble opening a file created in 2013"

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SteveL13Author Commented:
I developed but asked in the beginning which version was going to be used.  Was told 2013.  Then surprise!  Is actually 2007.
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
The VBA references do NOT downgrade automagically
Ummmm ... that's what I said. They'll generally upsize with no trouble, but they do not downsize.
Nick67Commented:
Ummmm ... that's what I said.
Yup, you said it while I was composing mine :)
I'm good, but until I actually commit my first post, I can't know that others are being composed, because I've rarely if ever hit 'monitor this' and then started writing my thoughts :)
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