Local move request from Exchange 2007 server to 2010

I am experimenting with move requests and noticed something and have a question about.

There is an Exchange 2007 server and an Exchange 2010 server

To move a mailbox from Exchange 2007 to 2010, from the Exchange 2010 console I right-clicked the mailbox and issued a new local move request, picked the target server/database (the 2010 server I'm issuing the move request from), and it went off and completed just fine.

Monitoring the Outlook client, there didn't appear to be any down time until after the move was completed.

After the move was completed successfully, the Outlook Client (Outlook 2013) eventually went into a Trying to Connect phase.
Then, a couple mins later after trying, it just "Disconnected".

So naturally, I close the Outlook 2013 client that this mailbox is being used on, and re-opened. It connected fine.
But I checked the connection status of Outlook in the system tray and noticed while it is connected to the 2010 server (MAIL2), it still has a "Exchange Public Folders" established to the Exchange 2007 server (MAIL1).

Questions are, I guess:

1. Should the Outlook client at any time disconnect after a mailbox move request; do users have to restart the Outlook client after their mailbox on the server side has been moved?

2. Is the "Exchange Public Folders" connection necessary? I guess there's no way to migrate that to 2010?
garryshapeAsked:
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Will SzymkowskiSenior Solution ArchitectCommented:
1. Should the Outlook client at any time disconnect after a mailbox move request; do users have to restart the Outlook client after their mailbox on the server side has been moved?
Whenever you move a mailbox to Exchange 2010 it will allow the user to continue to working until the move is completed (as you have experienced). Once it is completed the user HAS TO close Outlook and re-open Outlook to connect to the mailbox where it has been moved. This does not happen automatically.

Is the "Exchange Public Folders" connection necessary? I guess there's no way to migrate that to 2010?
You need to migrate your public folders to Exchange 2010. If you have not done so your clients will connect to public folders wherever they are located. When you create Public Folder replicas in Exchange 2010 you then assign the public folder replica to use on the mailbox database settings.

This setting tells the mailbox that is on this database to use a specific public folder. If there are no public folders in Exchange 2010 it will get it from 2007.

This is by design.

Will.

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garryshapeAuthor Commented:
Hi Will ok cool thanks

So on this Public Folders, interestingly, I don't even see any public folders as I expand in my Outlook folder view. That is strange. Is Public Folders a necessary connection? What's the best way to analyze what's in there (looking in the whole forest if needed) to see if it's really even necessary.
garryshapeAuthor Commented:
Using Public Folder Management console it doesn't appear that there even any public folders.

What are the "System Public Folders" for? Should that be kept for a migration to 2010 or 2013?
Will SzymkowskiSenior Solution ArchitectCommented:
In Outlook you will see near the bottom left corner a Folders VIew Icon. This view will allow you to view the public folders that are in your environment. From there you can see what public folders are visible to you.

There may be public folders that you do not directly have permissions to so you can view all public folders from the Public Folder Management Console. This is accessible from the Tools section in the Exchange Management Console.

You can get away without using public folders however, I would not just go and start removing them. If they are in your environment there are probably people using them so make sure that you check this first before actually removing them.

Will.
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