Micro USB Amps

I am not certain but I "think" that you can't go any higher than 2.1 amps with a standard micro-usb on ANY (home or car) charger such as the ones shown here http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_nr_p_72_0?fst=as%3Aoff&rh=n%3A2335752011%2Cn%3A2407755011%2Cn%3A2407761011%2Cn%3A2407770011%2Ck%3A2.1a+micro+usb%2Cp_85%3A2470955011%2Cp_72%3A2491149011&sort=price-asc-rank&keywords=2.1a+micro+usb&ie=UTF8&qid=1433488475&rnid=2491147011

However, my hotel room for this trip has new lamps with a standard two-prong plug outlet that is labelled as follows:

MAXIMUM
3.5 Amps
120 Volts
60 Hz

This MAXIMUM rating leads me to believe that you could supply up-to 3.5 Amps to a Micro USB cable. Is this possible?
frugalmuleAsked:
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dbruntonCommented:
No.

For USB the max is 5 amps at 5 volts DC, usually 1.5 to 2 amps (depends on various factors).

There is something terribly wrong with your figures.  120 volt??  That has to be AC not DC.  I suspect you are looking at the rating of your lamp rather than USB.
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frugalmuleAuthor Commented:
Hmm...  Where could I buy a 5amp micro usb?
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viki2000Commented:
MAXIMUM
3.5 Amps
120 Volts
60 Hz


That has nothing to do with USB.
The USB, as connector, supports up to 9A Max. at 5V in general and up to 5A max. in charging, depending by type and manufacturer.
 When comes to devices which have not only  USB connector, but also a USB port, then you need to know if it is USB 2.0 or 3..0 It is different current.
Have a look here: http://www.extremetech.com/computing/115251-how-usb-charging-works-or-how-to-avoid-blowing-up-your-smartphone

Check out the power specs of the USB here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USB#Power

If you look for example at this manufacturer, second page,  then is less than 5A:
http://www.mouser.com/pdfdocs/HiroseZX62Datasheet24200011.pdf


Why do you need 5A micro USB? Is it a charger? For what?
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dbruntonCommented:
Don't go over the 2 amp mark for compatibility and safety.
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frugalmuleAuthor Commented:
so usb 3.1 or usb-c are the latest adapters for ac and dc current, right?
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frugalmuleAuthor Commented:
so usb 3.1 or usb-c are the latest adapters for ac and dc current, right?
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dbruntonCommented:
NOT AC

USB 3 ports are supposed to be capable of handling up to 5 amps but maximum current is only 1.5 amps.

USB Type C devices can take up to 3 amps of charging power but you'll have to have device support for that and the power supplier (charger) will probably have to be capable of that and be able of communicating with the device.

USB 3 does NOT imply USB Type C and USB Type C does NOT imply USB 3.
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viki2000Commented:
For what do you need this "high current"?
If it is a charger, then will usual needs less than 1A for most of the portable devices.
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frugalmuleAuthor Commented:
hmm, how can I get 2 version 3 or version 3.1 ports on one charger?
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dbruntonCommented:
What amperage do you need?

You can get USB chargers for Apple devices that can put out 2 amps per USB port and have two ports on the charger.  That's more output than USB 2 or USB 3.  3.1 is just a change in the amount of data and not the amperage rating.

See http://www.amazon.com/Targus-Charger-Generation-iPhone-APA15US/dp/B004TXJ50U and browse the other options on the page.
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viki2000Commented:
USB 3.x can deliver 900mA, which is more than USB1.x and 2.0 which can deliver max 500mA.
USB Power
But I feel a confusion in the air.
When we speak about these current ratings we refer to a USB port, meaning a connector from a device which have behind a integrated circuit able to communicate over USB protocol.

When we refer to a charger with USB connector, then the story is different. It has no USB port behind. It is a switchable power supply, most probably constant current -  as a charger - to which is attached a USB connector.
Then the limitation comes from the charger - how much current can deliver as maximum value and final from USB connector which is able usually to sustain more than the charger can provide.

You cannot have a charger with USB Micro delivering more than USB Micro can sustain.
Here are the specifications of the USB Micro from another manufacturer:
USB Micro
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dbruntonCommented:
>>  But I feel a confusion in the air.

Yep.  The important line is the USB Battery Charging line in your table.  I think the questioner is only interested in charging.
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☠ MASQ ☠Commented:
You can put as much current as you like through the cable (until it turns into a radiant heater element), it's the device that you connect to that you need to worry about.  

USB chargers can put out a range of current depending on what they are designed for - my iPad Air delivers 2.4A which is fine for the iPad but if I connect one of my older cell phones that can't regulate the incoming current then the battery will

- 1 start to charge very quickly
- 2 start getting very hot
- 3 either pop or burst into flames

It's all about what the device can cope with and not what the charger is putting out.

(Incidentally to deliver that 2.4A at 12V the charger doesn't need more than 0.2A from the wall socket)
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frugalmuleAuthor Commented:
Are there any double .2 Amp sockets?
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dbruntonCommented:
I think you mean 2 amp sockets.

Read my post further up about using USB chargers for Apple devices.
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nobusCommented:
any wire delivering 5 A must have 1mm² square approx (abit more to be safe)
that does not go with a MICRO USB  device, that has very tiny cables

so you need a separate - powered device if you do need 5 A
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viki2000Commented:
If you look at pinout of Micro USB explained in wikipedia:
USB Pinout
You may see that Micro USB has 5 pins and pin 1 and pin 5 are used for power, meaning also charging.
In the datasheet from manufacturer of the connector of the USB Micro you can read that pin 1 and pin 5 can carry maxim 1.8A.
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frugalmuleAuthor Commented:
I really appreciate all of this info...  I'm still not sure what to do though.  I'm looking for a low price on something like this http://www.amazon.com/ZHOL-Charger-Adapter-Activated-Blackberry/dp/B00M26DQBK/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1433657627&sr=8-2&keywords=micro+usb+2.1+charger but that allows for 2 items to be charged at one time, and not have to worry about which side has more amps  Assistance in figuring out what to search for or buy on Amazon is greatly appreciated.
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viki2000Commented:
Tells us what are the "items" which you want to charge simultaneously.
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frugalmuleAuthor Commented:
Latest Samsung models, or any current microusb phone
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nobusCommented:
my advice is - buy a multiple device charger - and don't try charging more than 1 device over USB
but it's your call
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dbruntonCommented:
>>  that allows for 2 items to be charged at one time, and not have to worry about which side has more amps

Try this one http://www.amazon.com/Anker-Charger-PowerIQ-Technology-tablets/dp/B00B8L36A6/ref=lp_2407761011_1_12/184-6971744-7960557?s=wireless&ie=UTF8&qid=1433676313&sr=1-12

3,000 reviews and 4.5 stars.
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viki2000Commented:
I think the above proposed one will do the job. In fact any 20W 5V USB charger will do the job. They even can provide up to 24W with 4.8A, meaning up to 2.4A per connector.
The 1.8A maximum current specified for the Micro USB is the normal current rating for the pin 1 and pin 5, but that value can be exceeded and will not overheat the pins even if they are a bit overloaded according with original specs.
Don't forget that any of the chargers which are not bought directly from China, but from American or European market must pass e series of safety standards meaning they are safe, no overheat, no fire as long as you respect the power limits. And besides that there are over current protection limits implemented to avoid very high currents and overheat.
Then regarding the charging currents is important to remember that there is a curve of charging  with usually peak values in the beginning of charge when the battery is discharge and then lower values during normal charge and even lower when reaches close to full charge.
Here are other similar chargers  with the one above:
1, 2, 3

There are even 30W versions or 40W with over 10000 customer reviews and wide range input voltage 100-240VAC (http://www.ianker.com/product/71AN7105SS-BA)
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frugalmuleAuthor Commented:
What about a car charger?  The only ones I am seeing have 2.1a on one port and something lower on the other ones?
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dbruntonCommented:
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