practicality of wattage vs lux for home lighting..

the current bulb i need to replalce is
~~~
[FULL SPECTRUM LAMP; 150W A21 FROSTED; AVERAGE 5,000 HOURS; LUMEN OUTPUT 1550; Medium Base]
right now 6 of these lights the computer room.

1)
the below is http://www.amazon.com/Spectrum-Light-ALZO-Compact-Fluorescent/dp/B0018OS06S 
is 27W compared to 150W that I am trying to replace.. what is the practical effect of going up or down on Wattage? (it is more bright proportionally or does it take about more electricity intake or both)

2)how does all of this relate to 'lux'?
http://www.walmart.com/ip/Verilux-VT05FWW4-Verilux-HappyLight-6000-Full-Spectrum-Light-Therapy-System/13916977
why is the 'lux' not mention in the first amazon link? or does it go by another terminology?
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25112Asked:
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viki2000Commented:
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arnoldCommented:
Viki2000 pointed to the distinction.

Different filements required different currents to convert to light+heat. Often, 150 lights were either hallogen
Wattage is an indication of needed power. All the watt info tells you is that the new will consume less power.

Since your emphasis is lighting, you need to know what the lighting lumens/lux of the existing that you want replaced. Dispersion of light and other ...... Come into play.

The
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viki2000Commented:
If this is the bulb that you want to replace?:
http://www.lumiram.com/chromalux-incandescent-light-bulbs/5-a9-clear.html
http://www.lumiram.com/8-chromalux-incandescent-light-bulbs
IncandescentIf yes, then is incandescent bulb.
I am a bit surprised. In Europe is not allowed anymore incandescent bulbs with power >=100W, but in USA seems is still OK.
Remember: incandescent offer full spectrum, but CFL and LEDs never. You need a combination of several colors LEDs or special CFL combined with a dedicate diffuser in front of the bulb to achieve wide spectrum for light. I testes in the past some Philips fluorescent lamps sold in Nord European countries to reduce the suicidal rate due to long bad weather light, almost unbelievable when I heard first time and no idea if they had effect statically speaking. But full spectrum light close to sun light is known for a good wellbeing state of the men mood.
Just for curiosity, here is the latest innovation in matter of true sun light full spectrum:
http://www.coelux.com/
http://ec.europa.eu/research/innovation-union/ic2014/index_en.cfm?pg=showcase12

If your original bulb is incandescent then keep in mind that may have 16 lumens per watt, around 2400 lumens, but check with the manufacturer:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incandescent_light_bulb
It may have a bit more or even less:
https://www.1000bulbs.com/category/150-watt-standard-shape-light-bulbs/
https://www.fastenal.com/fc/products/details/0640106

You must compare lumens, light spectrum (good will be full spectrum), wattage and lifetime.
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rindiCommented:
Watts only tell you how much electricity the lamp uses (Volts x Amps = Watt). It tells you absolutely nothing about how much light it emits. Lux on the other hand is a measurement of the actual brightness of a lamp.

For example the old type filament light bulbs were pretty inefficient and used lots of watts, while modern LED bulbs use much less power to emit the same amount of light. A modern LED lamp that burns about 7.5W can be compared to an old light bulb that burned 50W in it's brightness. So modern LED lamps are much more energy efficient. Besides that, while the old bulbs would gradually get dimmer over time pretty quickly and had a relatively short life-cycle, LED's keep their brightness more or less until they die, and they should last longer.
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25112Author Commented:
thanks- helpful..
viki, you got the link right...

just for comparison, between the below two, if bright is my primary need, i should go with the higher wattage one, right?
(40 vs 150)
http://www.lumiram.com/chromalux-incandescent-light-bulbs/8-g25-clear.html
http://www.lumiram.com/chromalux-incandescent-light-bulbs/2-a9-clear.html
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
"... what is the practical effect of going up or down on Wattage? " ==>  Your electric bill :-)

The lumens of output shows you how much actual light a particular bulb generates.   The color temperature (measured in Kelvin) shows where in the light spectrum the light is [i.e. "sunlight", "cool", "warm", etc. => high color temps = "cooler" light];  and the wattage tells you how much power the bulb uses.

In general, incandescent lights use the most power;  compact fluorescents are next; and LEDs are by far the most efficient.

In the A21 socket, I can't find a 150w equivalent LED, but a 125w equivalent draws about 19w ... so, for example, if you used 6 of those in your computer room, the total power used would be LESS than ONE bulb is using now :-)     They are NOT, however, inexpensive ... I shudder to think how much I've spent in the last couple years replacing all of the bulbs in our home with LEDs => but I sure do like the impact it's had on our electric bill :-)

For a workplace, I'd think you'll want a color temp of 4000 or higher.
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25112Author Commented:
but are these 2 statements opposing each other:
viki:keep in mind that may have 16 lumens per watt
rindi:Watts only tell you how much electricity the lamp uses
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25112Author Commented:
Gary, is 'color temp' another phrase for lux?
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25112Author Commented:
my friend confirmed from store: these 3 are the options available..and it could be replaced today. if brightness was the top pic, would suggest the middle option as best?

full Spectrum: 150W A21 (Frosted) - lux 1550
full Spectrum: 100W A21 (Frosted) (Uses Only 72 Watts) - lux 1545
full Spectrum: 40W G25 Clear (does not mention lux value)
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viki2000Commented:
just for comparison, between the below two, if bright is my primary need, i should go with the higher wattage one, right?
(40 vs 150)
http://www.lumiram.com/chromalux-incandescent-light-bulbs/8-g25-clear.html
http://www.lumiram.com/chromalux-incandescent-light-bulbs/2-a9-clear.html


YES.
If both are incandescent bulbs, then higher wattage means brighter, more lumens.

is 'color temp' another phrase for lux?
NO.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_temperature
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
In the links in your last post, the 150w bulb here [ http://www.lumiram.com/chromalux-incandescent-light-bulbs/2-a9-clear.html ] provides 1675 lumens of light;  whereas the 40w bulb here [ http://www.lumiram.com/chromalux-incandescent-light-bulbs/8-g25-clear.html ] only provides 410 lumens ... so clearly the 150w bulb has FAR more light output.

Note, however, that this 19 watt bulb provides 1600 lumens !!
https://www.1000bulbs.com/product/137118/KOBI-K0N6.html
(That's more light than the bulb you're using now produces)

... and this 20 watt bulb produces 2000 lumens !!
https://www.1000bulbs.com/product/137121/KOBI-K1N7.html

LED bulbs are indeed a LOT more expensive than incandescents ... but they last a LOT longer (5-10 times) and use a LOT less power.    They're the only bulbs I buy these days.
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viki2000Commented:
my friend confirmed from store: these 3 are the options available..and it could be replaced today. if brightness was the top pic, would suggest the middle option as best?

full Spectrum: 150W A21 (Frosted) - lux 1550
full Spectrum: 100W A21 (Frosted) (Uses Only 72 Watts) - lux 1545
full Spectrum: 40W G25 Clear (does not mention lux value)


What do you mean by the "best"?
150W gives you more lumens, more light output, but consumes more wattage.
The 40W is opposite and the 100W is just less than 150W type.
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25112Author Commented:
<<
is 'color temp' another phrase for lux?
NO.
>>
The link does not show the Colot temp, does it:
http://www.lumiram.com/chromalux-incandescent-light-bulbs/2-a9-clear.html
is there a formula to calculate it ourselves?
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25112Author Commented:
>>LED bulbs are indeed a LOT more expensive than incandescents ... but they last a LOT longer (5-10 times) and use a LOT less power.    They're the only bulbs I buy these days.

good to know.. but inspite of high lux, they can't be categorized as 'full spectrum', right?
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25112Author Commented:
>>What do you mean by the "best"?
150W gives you more lumens, more light output, but consumes more wattage.
>>

i calrrified now and the advertisement says below specifics:

full Spectrum: 150W A21 (Frosted) - lux 1550
full Spectrum: 100W A21 (Frosted) (Uses Only 72 Watts) - lux 1545

even though the second one says 100W but the ad also says it only uses 72W but its lux is almost same as the 150W one?
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
"... Gary, is 'color temp' another phrase for lux? " ==>  No.

There are 3 basic things to look at ...

Wattage ==> how much power the bulb will use.

Lux ==> how much light it will produce

Color Temp ==> basically the "feel" of the light ... "daylight" is a fairly high color temp (6500);  "cool white" is around 4100-5000 (I like bulbs around 4000 or so);  "warm white" is the lower color temps (2700 or so).      "Full spectrum" lights generally have color temps of 5000 or higher.
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viki2000Commented:
OK, I did not notice the lux. Then is clear. The "full Spectrum: 100W A21 (Frosted) (Uses Only 72 Watts) - lux 1545" is the best choice from the those 3. The efficiency of the lamp is measured in lumen/watt.
Comparing bulbs/lamps type:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LED_lamp#Comparison_table
http://eartheasy.com/live_led_bulbs_comparison.html
http://www.cnet.com/how-to/five-things-to-consider-before-buying-led-bulbs/
For example the LUMIRAM 150W type is recommended to be replaced by a CFL 25W which provides only 1700 lumens, page 2 table at the bottom of the page.
http://www.luckyvitamin.com/images/brochures/Chromalux.pdf
The trend is indeed now the LED bulb. I have home some, but the light is not as good for the eyes as old incandescent.
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
"... good to know.. but inspite of high lux, they can't be categorized as 'full spectrum', right? " ==>  I'd say that's correct.

However, it'd be interesting to compare the performance of a bulb with a color temp of 5000 against what you're currently using ...

https://www.1000bulbs.com/product/112130/LED-1600AD50.html

A somewhat "pricey" experiment" ... but one bulb is only $20 to try -- and if it works well you'd save a bundle on electric costs :-)
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
"... I have home some, but the light is not as good for the eyes as old incandescent. " ==>  That depends a LOT on the color temperature of the bulbs you buy.   If you aren't liking the light, you're buying bulbs with the wrong color temp.    Note that you can buy bulbs that range from very "warm" (color temp 2700k) to "stark white" (color temp 5000k).    There's a BIG difference in how they "feel".    I've tried several, and find that I prefer bulbs in the 4000k range for replacing my A19 bulbs, but prefer the 2700k range for replacing our recessed ceiling spots.

Look at the bulbs you've bought that you don't like and see what the color temp is ... and try something different next time.   I suspect you'll be surprised at the difference.
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25112Author Commented:
viki, in the pdf you shared, they don't mention color temp for the regular FS bulbs, but only for FLUORESCENT; is there a reason? (or are they interrelated)
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25112Author Commented:
>>it'd be interesting to compare the performance of a bulb with a color temp of 5000 against what you're currently using ...
how do you suggest this performance test? (are you referring to longevity)

>>For a workplace, I'd think you'll want a color temp of 4000 or higher.
what is the theory behind this, Gary? higher color temp affect work productivity?
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rindiCommented:
If the color temp is "cold" that means the light looks "whiter", and "warmer" color temps mean it is more toward "yellowish". Old light bulbs tend to be warm because they have a yellowish spectrum, while fluorescent lamps are warm as they are more in the whitish spectrum (besides that the old bulbs also got warmer to touch than the fluorescents, but that doesn't really have to do anything with the light temperature). If you touch an old light bulb while it is on, it really gets hot, and that also shows you how inefficient they are, as most of the electricity goes into heating rather than lighting. Touch a LED lamp that is on, and you'll hardly notice any difference to when it is off.
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viki2000Commented:
viki, in the pdf you shared, they don't mention color temp for the regular FS bulbs, but only for FLUORESCENT; is there a reason? (or are they interrelated)

Yes, there is a reason. The CFL has usually a narrow light spectrum compared with incandescent.
 Spectrum
"If you touch an old light bulb while it is on, it really gets hot, and that also shows you how inefficient they are, as most of the electricity goes into heating rather than lighting. Touch a LED lamp that is on, and you'll hardly notice any difference to when it is off. "

That is not really true about all LED bulbs. Many are very hot, that's why they have metal heat sink on the side close to the socket.
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25112Author Commented:
>>The CFL has usually a narrow light spectrum compared with incandescent.

1)
are these
http://www.lumiram.com/chromalux-incandescent-light-bulbs/8-g25-clear.html
http://www.lumiram.com/chromalux-incandescent-light-bulbs/2-a9-clear.html
incandescent or CFL?

2)in your graph, what are those (extremely) sharp peaks in CFLs?
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
"... what is the theory behind this, Gary? higher color temp affect work productivity?  "  ==>  According to the Wikipedia article on this, "...  a warmer (i.e., lower color temperature) light is often used in public areas to promote relaxation, while a cooler (higher color temperature) light is used to enhance concentration in offices "

So apparently the higher color temps do indeed increase productivity.    According to what I've read, the "full spectrum" bulbs have color temps between 5000 & 7000, which seems very high to me.    It'd be interesting to see what one of those 5000k "stark white" bulbs looked like in your environment.
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viki2000Commented:
1) Incandescent
2) Iraddiance
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25112Author Commented:
thanks for your helpful recommendations. will test them in phases :)
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