Network Separation / Cisco 2960

Dear Experts,

Please advise on how to correctly separate the networks and what devices should be used and configured.  I have two networks - Public (internet access, etc.) and Private (should not be accessible from/to the Internet, but should be accessible from certain machines on the Public network).  Currently, all computers (belongs to both Public & Private networks) are sharing the same Cisco 2960 switch, but "separated" by their IP's on the subnets they belong to.  For instance,

Public subnet: 192.168.13.x
Private subnet: 192.168.1.x

Computer A on Public subnet has 2 adapters - IP 192.168.13.5 and IP 192.168.1.5
Computer B on Private subnet communicates with Computer A on IP 192.168.1.6

My concerns are:
is this enough to separate the two subnets as they are now
what if Computer A is compromised, would devices on Private network be compromised as well; if yes, what would be a correct way to "completely" separate them and how.

Thanks.
LVL 1
swgitIT ProfessionalAsked:
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bill30Commented:
I am assuming you have everything on the same LAN, and do not have the public/private subnets on their own vlans.  You need to have the subnets on seperate vlans.  This will force the subnets to go to the layer 3 router to communicate.  Now that the layer 3 router is controlling the exchange of information, you can set up access control lists to allow/deny traffic between the two vlans, and the internet.

To secure the devices that have access to the internet and your private network, you should separate those devices on a third vlan.  Then only allow traffic from the third vlan to your private network as needed.  Meaning deny everything but the specific applications that the internal network users need from this network.  This will limit the exposure that the possibly compromised computers can have on the private network.

What router are you using?
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swgitIT ProfessionalAuthor Commented:
the router is of an mpls
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