Linux Dual Boot Install, Fails to Boo

When attempting to install Ubuntu Linux on a Windows Vista laptop to use in dual-boot mode the install process seemed to complete as expected.  But when the computer was restarted it gives the following error message: "Error, no such partition. Entering rescue mode ...   grub rescue >"      By a user with very limited Linux experience, how can this be repaired ?  Typing the LS command lists the following:   (hd0)  (hd0, msdos1).    TIA,
LGroup1Asked:
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ThomasMcA2Commented:
There are several tools that can repair your boot loader. Try [boot-repair](http://sourceforge.net/p/boot-repair/home/Home/), [SystemRescueCD](http://www.sysresccd.org/Main_Page) or [Rescatux](http://sourceforge.net/projects/rescatux.berlios/).
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rindiCommented:
I'd try installing ubuntu again. Maybe you selected a wrong option during the installation. At the partitioning point I usually select manual, then the partition I want Linux to go to, a further one for the swap partition (If you want to use hibernation make it the same size as your RAM), and then also select where you want Grub to go. That should be the disk you are booting from (Usually /dev/sda).
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LGroup1Author Commented:
Thanks all.  I tried to the boot repair disks several times and also tried reinstalling Linux, but for some reason the GRUB boot error persisted.  I was able to use one of the boot repair disks to get the Windows MBR restored though and will just use Windows in standalone mode for a while.  Thanks again,
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ThomasMcA2Commented:
One problem with dual-booting is you only get to experiment/learn/play with Linux when you have time to boot into it. You will learn a lot more if you install Linux in a VirtualBox VM. Then you can run both at the same time.

Once you get more comfortable with Linux, I suggest installing Linux as the primary OS, then installing Windows as a VirtualBox VM. You will learn even more that way. I do that on my "production" laptop that I use for work, home, and school.
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LGroup1Author Commented:
Cool, that is a good idea.  Is the VirtualBox VM a free Type 2 Hypervisor ?
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rindiCommented:
Yes, and it is included within the repos of most Linux distro's. Many distro's even automatically recognize that they are running under VBox and will load the VBox drivers and additions so they will run fast. But Ubuntu doesn't belong to that category and it will run at very low resolutions and very slowly until you have loaded the guest additions. Personally I'd recommend almost every other distro, but not Ubuntu.
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LGroup1Author Commented:
What are the other free (and good) Linux distros ?
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rindiCommented:
Currently my favorite is MakuluLinux. There is a new version out based on Ubuntu and using the XFCE desktop, it is very fast and works well, or another new version is based on debian using a highly customized Cinnamon desktop that looks very much like Windows 7 Aero. Also this one works very well and is very fast.

Other distro's I use are OpenSUSE and another based on Fedora, Korora (but I haven't used that recently).
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ThomasMcA2Commented:
@rindi, I've never heard of MakuluLinux. I'll have to look into that the next time I distro-hop. I switched from openSUSE to Mageia 3-4 months ago, and I like Mageia a lot (probably because it works well on my current hardware.) I liked openSUSE until it broke my VMWare VM - something made the performance so bad that the system was barely usable. And that was while running XFCE. I prefer the speed of XFCE over the eye-candy in Gnome and KDE. When I installed Mageia, I also replaced VMWare with VBox. Performance with VBox in Mageia is snappy, and dual-head works well.
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rindiCommented:
With Makulu XFCE you still have lots of eye-candy. All the Makulu versions are the most beautiful distro's you can get.

Only one or 2 weeks ago I installed OpenSUSE as a VM on my ESXi 6 server and I haven't yet had any issues with it. It is fast (although not as fast as Makulu, but I used the KDE installation).

I've run Makulu in a VBox and there Dual head also works fine.

It's some time I tried mageia, I used some more time with PCLInuxOS which is similar, but also that has been some time. Particularly the "FullMonty" version was very nice, as it included everything you could wish for, but it was also a big iso.
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