Text overflow in Powerpoint 2010 text boxes - how to control

hi Folks
Just wondering - I'm aware that in Publisher there is a text overflow option. I wonder if there is anything similar in Powerpoint. So for example if I type in a text box and the text exceeds the limit of the text box, is there a way for me to direct that overflow into another text box or am I stuck with the existing options around automatic text re-sizing. Thank you.
LVL 1
agwalshAsked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

Jamie GarrochSenior Technical Consultant at BrightCarbonCommented:
Interesting question. As PowerPoint is a presentation app with more layout freedom when compared to a Publishing or Document app, the functionality you describe doesn't exist.

PowerPoint has three possible settings to control text in a text box when it overflows:

1. Do not Autofit (the textbox)
2. Shrink text on overflow
3. Resize shape to fit text

The reason I mention these is that the third option could be used by some VBA macro code to perform the feature you describe. But, there is no event to detect that the textbox size has changed so it would have to be a manual operation based on the user clicking a custom button in the ribbon or running the macro in the presentation. You'd also have to create a mechanism to define what your original textbox size was (possible with a custom right-click feature). The macro could then check to see if your text box had changed size and if it had increased, truncate (cut) the text until the box returns to it's former shape and copy that cut text into a second textbox. Because of the lack of the event described above, it would be a bit of a cumbersome solution but technically possible.

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
agwalshAuthor Commented:
OK, well that's good to know and I will pass on that answer :-)
agwalshAuthor Commented:
Gives me clarity around what I can and can't do in Powerpoint :-)
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Microsoft PowerPoint

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.