PowerShell get non Microsoft updates?

Hi,

The PowerShell Get-Hotfix command gets a list of Microsoft hotfixes. However, it does not get any of the third party updates that are installed via a msp file. For example, Adobe Reader XI (11.0.11)(1). You can see these via the Control Panel Uninstall an update area.

How can I get the list of updates that would include specific text in the name? In the example above, I would like to see a list of all updates for Adobe*.

I am looking for the equivilent of Get-Hotfix -Description Adobe*

Thanks
ckelsoeAsked:
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footechCommented:
I can't say exactly how the View installed updates area works.  For example, on my machine I have installed several .MSP patches to Adobe Reader X, but only the last one is shown.  Supposedly since v10, Adobe Reader (and Acrobat) updates are cumulative so that could be the explanation in Adobe's case.

Probably your best best of getting what you want is to use one of the scripts people have written for getting lists of installed software or updates and then filtering the results based on what you want.  My understand of Get-Hotfix is that is uses the Win32_QuickFixEngineering WMI class which only reports certain things.
You could try https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Get-Installed-Programs-fae091ed
Save the code to a file and then run it.  It will generate an .XML file with the results.  To view the results you could do something like
([xml](Get-Content ".\Programs.xml")).Programs.Program | sort programname | ft
# or to filter
([xml](Get-Content ".\Programs.xml")).Programs.Program | Where {$_.ProgramName -like "Adobe*"} | sort programname | ft

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ckelsoeAuthor Commented:
Wow - that is some code from the link you provided. Overkill for what I need. I will look for another method.

Thanks
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footechCommented:
True, it's fairly robust.  I don't know if I would've gone the route it did with creating the XML file and using C# (actually I know I wouldn't).  I think the amount of code could be reduced a great amount by just using custom PS objects.  But the good thing about it is: 1) it's already written; 2) it grabs programs/patches from registry, WMI, etc. instead of just one source so the list should be complete.  And from that list it's easy to filter down to what you need in different scenarios.  You could check out MS Technet Script Respository to see if anyone's written something that's a bit more brief.
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ckelsoeAuthor Commented:
Does not seem to be a simpler solution possible. This is way more complex that I really need, however, it does achieve the results needed. Thanks much
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