recursive union query

I have two temp table #d and #c:
create table #d(id int, channelid int , name varchar(20), price decimal(5,2))
insert into #d(id, channelid, name, price)values
(1, 1, 'Nokia', 100)
, (2, 2, 'Nokia', 101)
, (3, 3, 'Apple', 102)
, (4, 1, 'Apple', 103)
, (5, 2, 'Nokia', 104)
, (6, 3, 'Nokia', 105)
, (7, 1, 'Nokia', 106)
, (8, 2, 'Apple', 107)
, (9, 3, 'Apple', 108)

create table #c(channelid int , ChannelName varchar(20))
insert into #c(channelid  , ChannelName) values
(1, 'a')
,(2, 'b')
,(3, 'c');

select * from #d;
select * from #c;

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It produces:
name     a        b        c
Nokia	100.00		
Nokia		101.00	
Apple			102.00
Apple	103.00		
Nokia		104.00	
Nokia			105.00
Nokia	106.00		
Apple		107.00	
Apple			108.00

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using:
Select  d.name
  , case 
    when c.channelname = 'a' then cast(d.price as nvarchar(10))
	else '' end As a
  , case 
    when c.channelname = 'b' then cast(d.price as nvarchar(10))
	else '' end As b
  , case 
    when c.channelname = 'c' then cast(d.price as nvarchar(10))
	else '' end As c
from #d as d inner join #c as c
on d.channelid = c.channelid

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Is there an easier way to produce the same result, for example a recursive union query or something else?
LVL 34
Mike EghtebasDatabase and Application DeveloperAsked:
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Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:
You could do this recursively, but I don't know why you'd want to.  The SQL that you have works well and is probably faster than recursive SQL, especially if the amount of data grows.


Kent
0
dsackerContract ERP Admin/ConsultantCommented:
If you're thinking of using a CTE to pivot your data,  you'll be summing as a consequence:

;WITH myCTE AS
(
SELECT  d.Name,
        c.ChannelName,
        d.Price
FROM    #d d
JOIN    #c c on c.channelid = d.channelid
)
SELECT  Name,
        a, b, c
FROM    myCTE
PIVOT ( SUM(Price) FOR ChannelName IN (a, b, c) ) p

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0
Mike EghtebasDatabase and Application DeveloperAuthor Commented:
@Kdo,

Regardless of the performance, I like to learn how to apply recursive technique to this problem.

@dsacker,
Sorry, I want to produce:
name     a        b        c
Nokia	100.00		
Nokia		101.00	
Apple			102.00
Apple	103.00		
Nokia		104.00	
Nokia			105.00
Nokia	106.00		
Apple		107.00	
Apple			108.00

Open in new window


Your solution doesn't do that. Please see the original question.

Mike
0
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dsackerContract ERP Admin/ConsultantCommented:
Here is a solution with UNION ALL and a CTE:

;WITH myCTE AS
(
SELECT Name, Price AS a, NULL  AS b, NULL  AS c FROM #d WHERE ChannelId = 1 UNION ALL
SELECT Name, NULL  AS a, Price AS b, NULL  AS c FROM #d WHERE ChannelId = 2 UNION ALL
SELECT Name, NULL  AS a, NULL  AS b, Price AS c FROM #d WHERE ChannelId = 3
)
SELECT  *
FROM    myCTE
ORDER BY ISNULL(a, 0) + ISNULL(b, 0) + ISNULL(c, 0)

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0
Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:
Hi Mike,

As pointed out, PIVOT is probably more practical in this application, but if you want to use it to learn recursive SQL, I can certainly help.

There are a couple of articles in the DB2 pages that walk you through recursive SQL to convert rows to column or columns to rows.  Your data has every data point in a separate row so you're wanting to convert rows to columns.

  http://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/3618/Recursive-SQL-in-DB2-Converting-rows-to-columns.html
  http://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/3629/Recursive-SQL-in-DB2-Converting-Columns-to-Rows.html

The technique is identical in SQL Server.  The most significant change between the SQL used by DB2 and SQL Server is that DB2 uses the double-pipe (||) for string concatenation and SQL Server uses plus (+).  

For this application, the CTE will need to return the 4 rows that you want.  "name", "a", "b", and "c".  The upper sub-query within the CTE will select all rows from the table where channelid=1.  The lower sub-query will then populate the columns where channelid=2 or 3.

Give it a try and post your SQL.  I'll give you a hand.


Kent
0
Vitor MontalvãoMSSQL Senior EngineerCommented:
There's is nothing recursive in your data. Would be if you have something like levels or hierarchies (master/detail; parent/children; country/cities; ...) so you can go recursive level by level.
So, PIVOT should be the solution for your question.
0

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