Can a CDX FoxPro file be opened by another application

I have a client with an old FoxPro application that they want move into either ACCESS or SQL Express.  However, I do not have FoxPro and just need to open the tables, is there a way to convent/move such files?
Sandra SmithRetiredAsked:
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Kanti PrasadCommented:
Hi

The below list of programs can open .cdx extensions

http://extension.nirsoft.net/cdx
Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
You can "Link" the Foxpro tables into Access, and view the contents:
In Access:
External Data-->ODBC-->Link
Click: New
Select the (English) FoxPro Driver
Then select the location of the FoxPro file...
Sandra SmithRetiredAuthor Commented:
The list did not have what I needed and Jeff, I tried but still does not work.  I think part of the problem is this database is so old that no driver will recognize it.  I an open in Notepad, but it is a jumble and not what I need.
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pcelbaCommented:
CDX file is just an index and you don't necessarily need it when converting the data. You should use just DBF files and these files are visible in Access when you install VFP 6 ODBC driver to your PC. Link for the download is here: http://fox.wikis.com/wc.dll?Wiki~VFPODBCDriver~Wiki

ODBC driver is 32 bit so you have to use 32 bit MS Access. Older Access versions are better for this task...

Not only DBF but also FPT (memo) files can contain important data obviously.

VFP ODBC driver can access DBF files created in old FoxPro versions but the DBF file could be created in newer FoxPro version. In such case you would need VFP OLE DB driver and write a short VBA code to access the data.

The first byte of the DBF file can tell what FoxPro version it was created in. Are you able to look at the first byte of the DBF file in some hexadecimal editor?

You may also download the free FoxPro commands interpreter which allows the DBF file opening and saving in e.g. CSV format. Just tell if you are interested.

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Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
Then investigate what Kanti Prasad posted.

As a longshot, see if Excel can open the file.
Sandra SmithRetiredAuthor Commented:
Thanks, will try what pcelbal suggested.  I did try excel, but there  was no way to parse as the data came in as one long string and whomever created the tables had column upon column with unintelligble names.
PatHartmanCommented:
Keep in mind that in their infinite wisdom (?), MS deprecated the feature that allowed linking to .dbf files from Access 2013 so you'll need to use an earlier version.
pcelbaCommented:
Access never allowed to read pure Visual FoxPro files without VFP ODBC driver. And the ODBC driver causes newer Access versions crash in many cases.

And yes, Access 2013 data engine does not allow to read dBase DBF files any more.

Microsoft is incompatible internally...
Sandra SmithRetiredAuthor Commented:
I had to dig around and find an old version of ACCESS, both 2000 and 95.  Fortunately, hubby is also a computer network engineer out of NASA and Never throws anything out. (Our garage is a computer museum!)    Based on the information you provided, he was able to get the correct driver and pull the data into SQL Server rather than ACCESS.  It was a trial but finally got the data.  Thank you all for the help and suggestions.  I now have my client's historical data as well as current and can create an application that will really meet their needs.
pcelbaCommented:
Great!
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