Terminal Server licensing - Can 2008 RDS license server serve up 2003 Terminal Server licensing (clients)?

How is this accomplished?
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K BAsked:
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Ben HartCommented:
When I looked at just such a thing 4 years ago it could not.  We would have had to upgrade our Terminal Servers to 2008 along with all the Client Access licenses.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
You should be moving away from 2003 now - it's no longer supported.

I'm not sure where Ben Hart obtained his information, but here's a blog on the subject from Microsoft -- in short, it should work fine for all versions down to 2000 Terminal Services:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/rds/archive/2010/03/12/managing-lower-version-licenses-from-a-license-server-running-windows-server-2008-r2.aspx
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Ben HartCommented:
From our vendor who 'handles' our EA.  That was almost 5 years ago now.. we just stuck with our 3 '03 hosts and forgot about it.  Besides there is zero reason to move away from an OS just because it's EOL or no longer supported.  Not everyone calls/pays MSFT for tech support, if the system works then it works regardless of what version it is.
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K BAuthor Commented:
One of the clients is a hospital and there is medical equipment attached to these EOL machines. When patients lives hang in the balance it becomes pretty important to be able to call Microsoft.
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Ben HartCommented:
Sounds like a bad decision the hospital IT staff made then, sticking with EOL operating systems if the need to call professional support is that great.
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K BAuthor Commented:
Perhaps, but these are the facts.  Thus, the question at hand.
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Ben HartCommented:
So they're already paying thru the nose for phone access support.  So the fact that their OS is EOL is a null point.  Im sorry if you thought my comment about about not everyone calls MSFT for support was somehow meaning you personally.. or your client personally. I thought the 'everyone' part would have sufficiently covered that fact that I was talking about everyone. Not even sure why you felt the need to mention patients lives.

I did find a couple more resources you can try:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh553159(v=ws.10).aspx
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/rds/archive/2009/03/06/migrating-a-windows-server-2003-license-server.aspx
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
EOL is NOT JUST ABOUT SUPPORT.  It's about security.  And if this is a hospital, this is almost certainly a HIPAA violation (if they are in the US) and probably a regulatory violation elsewhere too) if they don't do like the US military and purchase a REALLY EXPENSIVE support deal to continue support.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
And with adjustments to HIPAA in the last few years, that puts the IT company ALSO at risk of the violation. If that machine gets malware because of an unpatched 2003 vulnerability that starts transmitting patient information outside the organization, the fines on the hospital AND IT company could be huge.
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K BAuthor Commented:
This is a unique scenario where the machines in EOL are not on the internet... Additionally, the software in question does not support above 2003 until this month.
I appreciate everyone's concern but there are a few details that I am not revealing which would certainly change your view.  The comments I made above were to make it apparent that most need to move away from EOL and to sway us away from the status quo.  Perhaps a bit too provocative.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
That's fine - at this point, your aware of the issues.  I've posted confirmation that 2008 and later can handle the licenses - are you having issues getting this working?  Do you not know where to begin?  "How is this accomplished" is a broad question and I assume you have a basic understanding if you're a consultant and have a hospital as a client.
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