2003 Active Directory Group Policies - post upgrade to 2008R2

I have done this for customers in the past but I am trying to recall what occurs.
End user?  As I remember they will get the same group policy, correct?
Admins? editing GPOs created in 2003 - now living in 2008R2 AD. What has changed?  What won't be able to be changed after eliminating all 2003 Domain Controllers?
Central Store or ?
Any decent links for this process?
Thanks!
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K BAsked:
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Henrik JohanssonSystems engineerCommented:
If GPOs are applied depends on the clients (read explanation of specific GPO setting) and isn't related to version of DCs. You edit GPOs like before by using GPMC.

The new thing about GO is the Central Store which stores policy definitions in ADMX and language definitions ADML files in a central location instead of having them on every client computer used for management or policy evalutation (RSOP). This saves space as the policy files don't need to be kept in each GPO like old ADM files needed. Central Store is used by Vista/2008 and newer clients.
See KB https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/929841 about setting up Central Store.

When decommision last old DC, you can raise DFL/FFL to newer version to get advantage of newer AD features like AD Recyclbe Bin and convert SYSVOL replication to use DFSR instead of old FRS.
When raising DFL/FFL, you will not be able to have older DCs than the functional level.
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K BAuthor Commented:
Thank you for the reply.

I remember when moving from 2000 DCs to 2008R2, certain settings - we could not edit.   Is it the same from 2003 to 2008 R2?  I believe certain items moved from policies to preferences.
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Henrik JohanssonSystems engineerCommented:
GPO edit is like applying related to version of the client OS, and not the DCs.
The only major thing I remember changed between 2000 and XP/2003 was some folder redirection settings that earlier was separate managed was changed to inherit/follow documents folder. In 2008/Vista, it was changed again to have more redirection options.
Except of that, the issue you mention sounds like changed ADM files for Adminsitraative Templates.

Group Policy Preferenes (GPP) is a complement for stuff not done in regular GPO Policies. GPP was introduced for Vista, but was also made available for XP with some update.
GPP makes it possibly to replace scripting executed through GPO startup/logon scripts. GPP can be used for example publishing files, shortcuts, printers, registry values.
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K BAuthor Commented:
So are you saying there will be no change to end users?  There will be no change to the admins creating or editing GPOs?
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K BAuthor Commented:
Henrik,
Thank you for your extensive replies. I was wondering if you had a comment regarding my last question in this thread. If you feel it is out of scope I could open a new question.
Thanks again.
K.B.
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