Why allpicture images won;t print on report?

I have a 27 page report which has 6 pictures per page.  When I do a report view they all display.  But when I do a print preview they do not all display.  Also when I export to a pdf they do not all display.

What's going on?
SteveL13Asked:
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Anders Ebro (Microsoft MVP)Microsoft DeveloperCommented:
I had this issue maybe 5 or 7  years ago using Access 2003. The issue at the time was (by my own best guess) that Access ran out of memory. The images were jpegs of quite high resolution. So the individual jpegs didn't take up much space, but it is my belief that access at the time would convert them into bitmaps (And suddenly those 400k jpegs became 20mb bitmaps) and eventually ran out of memory. Just like your case, the first X images would print, and then the rest would not, and there was no error message or anything.

Our solution at the time: I manually opened the about 100 images we used, rescaled them to about a quarter size, and saved em. The reports all ran fine after that.

How are you getting the images on the report? Through code, by attachment field, or by a linked path?

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Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
Anders Ebro is correct, I had the same issue as well where certain images would print and others wol not.

Try using the "Attachment" datatype in Access 2007 and newer (but you must upgrade to the .accdb format)
The images will display, ... and you may not have the memory issues due to them being compressed internally.

You did not state what happens when you actually make a hardcopy/printout of the report...

Jeff
Anders Ebro (Microsoft MVP)Microsoft DeveloperCommented:
Later versions of access (2010 for sure, maybe 2007 too) has support for binding an imagecontrol to a text field, where the text field contains the path to the file. It works like a charm.

Attachment fields has some easy of use, but is in my opinion best suited for really small databases.
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SteveL13Author Commented:
Jeffrey, when I make a hardcopy/printout of the report all of the pictures do not print out.

I don't like the attachment field usage because there are going to be many many large files and in time it'll blow the computer up!  (just kidding but it will get really large)

Anders... I did try re-sizing the images with a bulk image resizer but still, all the pictures do not print.
Anders Ebro (Microsoft MVP)Microsoft DeveloperCommented:
Ill repeat this since its important, but you must have missed it:
How are you getting the images on the report? Through code, by attachment field, or by a linked path?
Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
Steve,

Please reply to Anders Ebro's questions first.


One workaround was to split/filter the report and print only enough pages that will be fully displayed...

For example, filter the report for the first 10 records, then see if all the images on these 10 pages display properly.
If not then decreased the filter to 5 records.
I would not go much lower than this (5), else you have to run your filter too many times.

The hope here is that you can print 2 "groups" of 10 records, ...then print the remaining 7.
(You may have to do some trickery, like closing the report, before printing the next lot...)

What is happening is that for Printing and Print Preview, Access must "Render" the report in its entirety.
(images, groups, Filters, Sorting, manage all of the report properties, AND run any code...)
This takes a lot of resources, hence, some images may not print.

Jeff
Anders Ebro (Microsoft MVP)Microsoft DeveloperCommented:
Also this might be relevant: Which version of Access are you running?
SteveL13Author Commented:
Anders - by a linked path
Anders Ebro (Microsoft MVP)Microsoft DeveloperCommented:
If you are allready doing it by a linked path, and have shrunk the images in resolution, then I am out of ideas.

Is your machine "old", or with very little ram?

I have a system where the images are shrunk down to the size needed for the report. I.e. in the report I know the resolution that the printer can produce for the area covered by the image is 200x100, so thats what I scale the images down too. With that method I've succesfully printed a 80 page report with over 200 images all showing up. So I know it should be possible.
Nick67Commented:
What's going on?
You are exceeding Access's ability to render your images to print.

I have two detailed articles about this issue, and workarounds
http://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/13519/Printing-many-large-images-in-MS-Access-reports.html
http://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/13779/More-Fun-with-Really-Large-High-Fidelity-Images-in-Access-Reports.html

Read through them.

Basically, you can either beforehand, or dynamically through code resize images to be ~150 DPI and they will print unless you get thousands of them.  I've printed 450 2" x 3" pictures on a report using the techniques detailed in the articles.

Given it druthers, Access will print images at 96 DPI.  The higher you force the DPI to go by printing an image in a smaller control , the more trouble Access has dealing with it.  The RAM and jam that the machine rendering the print job has, the more you can get away with.  My dual-Xeon 12 GB RAM server could render more images that desktop machines would crash or hang Access attempting.

Anders... I did try re-sizing the images with a bulk image resizer but still, all the pictures do not print.

Take the height and width of the control that the images display in.
Multiply each by 150.
Resize your images to that many pixels of height and width and try again.
Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
Steve,

I have had success with the "Filtering" approach as well.
This way, you may not have to adjust image sizes/resolution. (and possible have to deal with  loss of clarity...)

So you have a few avenues to peruse here...

FWIW, Access does not really "do" images well.
It was designed to do perhaps one image per record (ex. An Employee report, ...one employee, one picture.)
At the time images were added to Access, 100KB Bitmaps were considered "Huge".
Things only got complicated with jpgs (as another expert has point out, ...Access will internally convert the jpg to a bitmap for display purposes, ...thus bloating the db.)
Note that even with the new "attachment" field (where you can have multiple images per image), it is a bit tricky to "display" more than one image.

When you get to the point of using Access like a "Catalog" of images, Access is not the best tool.
Then you need to bump up to a different reporting tool

For example , I know that Crystal Reports does a bit better with reports images than Access.
But event then, my guess is that even Crystal Reports has limits.

There may be other newer reporting tools available, that you can research on your own.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_reporting_software

Ultimately, ...if this is more of an image cataloging system, ...you may want to look into a "Desktop Publishing" application...

JeffCoacman
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