Access 2010: Career questions (4) A2010 and VB.NET

Hi EE,

a) Do you code your own properties and classes  (so far I did not get the hang of it)
    I do understand how to use what is built into Access for the most part (the Excel properties sometimes confuses me :-) )

    If you do, do you also code VB.NET

    If I do not know yet how to code custom properties and classes, given that I have been using A2003 and A2010
       do you think I could get started quickly.....

b) I am not sure if this is a bad thing, the way I get/update data is by using DAO and handwriting SQL and placing it
in a string to be executed by CurrentDB

    In A2010,  do you use ADO  or DAO

    In VB.NET  do you use ADO, DAO, or maybe you use SQL Server and use something else like stored procedures


You see, I am trying to figure out if I can apply for VB.NET positions without having actually coded in VB.NET.
Being honest in my cover letter and resume about, just wanting to know if I can explain that it would not be a huge learning curve ....

tx, sandra
mytfeinAsked:
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
The short answer to this is that vb.net is nothing like VBA.   VBA is object based, not an Object Orientated Programming language.  That is a huge difference in the way you approach the programming.

Second is that .Net is built on top of the .Net Framework, which has thousands of classes.  

There's no way around it; vb.net is a huge learning curve.

Jim.

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AndyAinscowFreelance programmer / ConsultantCommented:
I agree with the learning curve.  You are talking of chalk and cheese.

>>do you use ADO, DAO, or maybe you use SQL Server and use something else like stored procedures
Erm - do you really understand your own question?  (There are completely different things being talked about as if they were similar)
mytfeinAuthor Commented:
tx so much Jim!  I appreciate your honestly and clear explanation....  I feel the time has come for me to move on to something else and am researching what the "something else" might be.

For example, I watched videos on crystal reports on You tube, and said to myself, not bad

Then I came to EE, to post my practical questions, and based on the information, do not think that Crystal reports is for me bec the EE expert explained that would need to buy 3rd party products for scheduling, email etc    (which one can do with A2010, Task scheduler etc)
so it saved me time to set aside Crystal Reports  and research other areas.

tx, Jim

p.s. do you recommend a group to post further Career questions?  tx......
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mytfeinAuthor Commented:
Hi Andy,

tx for your reply and information!

sandra
AndyAinscowFreelance programmer / ConsultantCommented:
>>do not think that Crystal reports is for me bec the EE expert explained that would need to buy 3rd party products for scheduling, email etc

Again, that sort of makes me think you do not understand just what crystal reports is and what it is used for.  (ps.  there is a big hint in the name)

You might want to post a question more like:
I have experience in...
I would like to learn more about ....
What do you suggest ?
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
I missed the follow on's:

b) I am not sure if this is a bad thing, the way I get/update data is by using DAO and handwriting SQL and placing it
in a string to be executed by CurrentDB

 That's not a bad way.   I'm sure you've found in Access that there a lot of different ways you can do things with record operations:

1. With what's built into access forms
2. In code with recordsets.
3. In code with SQL Statements.

so no, it's not "bad" any more than another way is.  But if your not using dbFailOnError, along with the .Execute, it's bad<g>.   It's also somewhat bad (slower) if your using CurrentDB() everywhere with that.

In A2010,  do you use ADO  or DAO

Open in new window


  A mix.  Depends on what I'm using for a datastore.  If JET, then DAO.  If anything else, then generally ADO.

Jim.
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
<<tx so much Jim!  I appreciate your honestly and clear explanation....  I feel the time has come for me to move on to something else and am researching what the "something else" might be.>>

 vb.Net most likely; you certainly would not lack for work.  You'd be able to leverage some of your skills with VBA, but it will be a steep learning curve.

In an OOP language, everything is built on classes and objects created from those classes.   A simple example where I might have:

a base class of "Text Box"
  a subclass of that for "my application"
     a sub class of that for "date only"
     a sub class of that for "numeric only"
     a sub class of that for "text"

 so I have three levels here (a class hierarchy).   If I make a change in my base class, say having the text highlighted when I enter the control, it effects everything sub classed off of it.

  "My Application" might be a level where I define application specific things, like a security scheme.  

  The subclasses below that would all have that highlight feature and security scheme, and further changes for handling the various formats.

   When I want to use one of those classes, I instantiate an object based on the class.   it then has all the PEM's (Properties, Events, and Methods) of that class.

  That's basically what you work with and it's very non-linear.

   VBA uses classes (that's what a form is), but it only has partial inheritance.  So while you work with objects, you don't have the full power of an OOP language and don't work with it in the same way

Jim.
mytfeinAuthor Commented:
Hi Jim,

thx for your explanation... wow layer and layers.....

yes I am used to a linear approach.... so my brain would have to get used to an "inside-out"? kind of thinking....

will locate on youtube some basic vb.net vids for more info....

tx so much, sandra
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)President / OwnerCommented:
<<thx for your explanation... wow layer and layers.....>>

  Yes.  There are whole textbooks alone on the subject of design patterns and working with classes and a OOP based language.

 Then there are the classes themselves that Microsoft has written as part of the .Net Framework to learn.   If you have not worked with a OOP based language before, it will be a steep learning curve.

<<yes I am used to a linear approach.... so my brain would have to get used to an "inside-out"? kind of thinking....>>

 Well non-linear at least<g>.   Your somewhat used to that with Access as it is largely event driven.  Within VBA though, you can have functions and procedures that stand on their own.

 Not so with an OOP based language.  Your always working within events of objects and nothing else.

Jim.
mytfeinAuthor Commented:
tx JIm! very helpful overview.... tx!
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