Computer not connecting to Synology NAS

I'm migrating files from a Windows 2003 server to a Synology NAS.  I've used the Synology several months without difficulty.  This afternoon I moved another set of files and updated a .bat file that runs on login to point to the Synology drive.  Now when I log in with one Windows 7 computer (Call it 'A'), the .bat file runs and the connections are fine.  When I log in with the users computer (Call it 'B'), the computer won't connect to the Synology drive.  I tried pinging the Synology server from computer 'B' without success.  But a ping from computer 'A' is fine.  

I know that's not much to go on, but I'm stumped to understand the difference between the 2 computers to cause one to work fine while the other doesn't connect.

Thanks for any help in advance.

Steve
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stkoontzAsked:
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Wayne88Commented:
Are you using ISCSI or just folder sharing?
stkoontzAuthor Commented:
Thanks for coming on to give me a hand.

What's ISCSI?  

Also, I should have mentioned that yesterday I shut down the Synology NAS.  When I restarted it the IP address changed.  I switched the Synology to a static IP address and kept it the new address.   The computer with the problem wasn't started until after I moved the files.  (I noticed that it picked up the old IP address of the Synology.)  So the problem might be the change in IP address.

Steve
stkoontzAuthor Commented:
This morning I realized that I plugged the network cable into port 1 instead of port 2 when I plugged back in the Synology.  That's why the IP address wasn't static.  So I plugged the network cable back into port 2 and now have the old IP address back.  (I don't know why I originally used port 2)

The odd thing is that now in the Windows 2003 server the address leases next to the Synology IP address says "Bad_Address."  All other computers are operating normally. It's just the one computer that now can't ping the Synology.
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Wayne88Commented:
Hi Steve,

Sorry for the late reply.  Wasn't checking last night.

In short, ISCSI is a way to mount a volume from a NAS and the computer will sees it and accept it as a local volume.

"When I log in with the users computer (Call it 'B'), the computer won't connect to the Synology drive.  I tried pinging the Synology server from computer 'B' without success.  But a ping from computer 'A' is fine.  "

It could be due to the firewall settings.  Check Control Panel > Security > Firewall to see if you have any special rule.

"The odd thing is that now in the Windows 2003 server the address leases next to the Synology IP address says "Bad_Address."  All other computers are operating normally. It's just the one computer that now can't ping the Synology."

It may be due to the fact that you assigned a static IP to a leased address or that when you mixed the two ports on the Synology the server sees it as two devices (different MAC) using the same IP.  You can delete the IP lease from the server if the Synology is set for static IP.  The lease shouldn't matter.

Wayne
stkoontzAuthor Commented:
I think I solved it.  The only thing on the workstation that had changed was the the ip address it was picking up was the address of the unused port 1 on the Synology.

I set the workstation that wasn't connecting to a static IP address.

On the Windows server, I created an 'exclusion range' that consisted of just the ip address for port 1 (unused port) on the Synology.

Then I set the ip address of the workstation back to get an address from the server.


That got the workstation off the Synology ip address and all is good now.

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Wayne88Commented:
Great to hear you got it solved on your own.  Hope that fixed it. Cheers!
stkoontzAuthor Commented:
Wayne,

Thanks for the suggestions, but I think what I did would help others the most if they find this question.

Steve
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