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Rob
Flag for Australia asked on

WiFi AP Purchase

I'm looking to know what to buy in terms of being able to extend my home WiFi.

I have an office out the back (separate from the house).  The router is in the house, roughly located in the middle of the house, front to back.  Unfortunately there is a Flue (metal) for our gas heater that runs up through the same cupboard that the router (and other relevant WiFi devices are) that I believe is attenuating the Wireless signal.

I've tried powerline and cheap repeaters (tp-link) with no luck (dropouts)

I'm looking for advice on either whether just a super fancy attenna would do the trick or is there a reliable and robust Access Point that would be able to cover the distance to the front and back of the house?  (I'd like it to have 2.4 and 5 GHz).

I'm located in Australia so as long as I can buy it from here then it'll be suitable.

If it helps, this is a local distributor that I buy from occassionally: http://www.msy.com.au/saonline/
Wireless NetworkingWireless HardwareNetworkingNetwork Architecture

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Rob

8/22/2022 - Mon
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John Tsioumpris

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Rob

ASKER
Hi John,

Good suggestion and definitely possible for the back of the house but the signal drops off dramatically towards the front of the house.  It's essentially passing through 3 double brick walls.  I currently have the router and its wireless on and on a different SSID/Channel to the other AP I've got.  They are either side of the flue but i'm also unsure of the minimum distance they should be from the flue.
Rob

ASKER
I've tried a repeater to deal with the front of the house but we've got a Fritz!box that does not "repeat" well.  So I ended up buying another Access Point, plugged directly into the router.  I'll have a play moving it around with a long cat5 cable.

I've got young kids so I can't have cables running all over the floor (as much as I'd like to) LOL
Rob

ASKER
Line of sight from the router, it's 12m to the front of the house (3 double brick walls), 20m to where you'd be sitting in the office out the back (2 double brick walls, 1 wooden panel wall).
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Rob

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Rob

ASKER
Great advice!
John Tsioumpris

For power over Ethernet to work efficiently it needs to be on the same circuit...on the same fuse and this when there are not any other electrical devices like power strips....and of course the speeds are only in theory...
The fact is that unless you connect AP to your router with Cat5e you won't get maximum speed...especially if you use Wireless AC (of course this means routers with gigabit ports)
Rob

ASKER
Nothing that fancy here! :)

Yeah, haven't had much success with the powerline. It made a connection if I had one if the devices near the fuse box as the length going back to the fuse box and onto the other circuit was shorter.  but that's no good as that power point was no where near the router! So yes there's still a way to go with that technology.

AP is now connected directly to the router :) thanks again for your help
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