Amplified Digital Outdoor TV Antenna

I'm planning on "cutting the cord" on cable TV and wanted to know a cheaper alternative to cable?  I was told that purchasing my own antenna would be the best way, but what type of antenna do I buy?  I live in Orange, California which is considered Southern California.  

Your thoughts and maybe your personal experience in this field would be appreciated.
Jay SmithAsked:
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
An antenna will only pick up 'over the air' broadcasts meaning your local TV stations.  They are required to broadcast in digital format now so you can get a pretty good signal and picture.  But an antenna receiving 'over the air' signals is also subject to interference like when the helicopters or planes fly in between you and the TV transmitter.

You can buy an antenna and use it in parallel with your cable connection to see if you will get what you want.  Amazon, Best Buy, or Radio Shack (if there is still one open near you) are good places to find antennas.  Amazon has quite a few outdoor antennas listed on their site.  Radio Shack seems to be all indoor units.  Best Buy has some too.

Note that outdoor antennas have to be mounted on an antenna pole or tower.  Make sure that is allowed in your neighborhood.
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MereteCommented:
From personal experience the personal internet satellite dish will only receive from transmitters the codes/signals you have paid for. Cable transmissions is just not free regardless if you own the satellite dish.
Cloud interferes with it so they have to be tuned.
Your best choice is internet connected cable with a box supplied from your cable TV.
I'm in Australia so cant actually provide the best Dish suggestions as I have Australian products.
My Dish is on the roof and is small but has no problems it is provided by my Cable Foxtel.
A quick google produced this,
Internet, TV, and Home Phone Services
in Los Angeles, California
http://www.att.com/local/california/los-angeles/
Digital Cable, Satellite & IPTV
http://www.bestbuy.ca/en-CA/category/digital-cable-satellite-iptv/20227.aspx
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viki2000Commented:
Keep in mind one thing: no matter if you switch to terrestrial antenna + amplifier or a satellite dish, you will get without paying only the free channels. But if you want to have special channels, then you have to pay for them no matter if we speak about cable TV or satellite dish.
Before you switch to antenna system, just make a list with what would like to watch and see if they are free or not – at least some important channels for you.
Terrestrial antennas are easier to install, setup, adjust and maintain, but they do not offer always too many channels.
Then based on your list check to see if the terrestrial broadcasting signals corresponding to your desired TV channels are present in your region – there are lists on internet.
When we speak about how many channels, then obviously the satellite dish is the winner. You can get thousands of them from different satellites , so you have to make a selection.
For dish satellite there are 2 options: either you pay a provider, similar as cable TV, or if your desired channels are all free, then again are 2 options for checking: hard approach - either you take channel by channel and check on their website on what satellite broadcasts, or easiest approach – check what satellites broadcast on your region – their beam spot , eventually use 2-3 LNBs on the same dish or even a motorized antenna (not so expensive) to catch the signals from more satellites simultaneously with a bigger diameter of the dish.
How I did in the past: dish, 80cm diameter, 1-2 LNBs, sometimes motorized for 2-3 satellites. Thousands of free channels. Then later when I wanted I bought some channels from a provider for free limited time as 1 year for example.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_television_stations_in_California
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satellite_television_in_the_United_States
http://www.lyngsat.com/freetv/United-States.html
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Jay SmithAuthor Commented:
Another questions...

I used to have DirectTV and the satellites are still on my roof, would I be able to connect the coaxil connection from these satellites and, not neccesarily, get access to their network, but be able to view HD  local channels?
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
I don't think so.  The satellite broadcasts are on different frequencies than the over the air signals and the antennas are pointing in the wrong direction.
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viki2000Commented:
HD local channels - no, but free to air channels from satellites where the dish is pointing to - yes.
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