Indexes From Every Angle: What happens to non-clustered indexes when the table structure is changed on SQL server 2008

Dear all,

 I am reading this :Indexes From Every Angle: What happens to non-clustered indexes when the table structure is changed?

any article shows what will happen on non clustered index when table schema changed for SQL server 2008/2008 R2/2012/2014?
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marrowyungSenior Technical architecture (Data)Asked:
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Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Data DudeCommented:
>I am reading this :Indexes From Every Angle:
Would help if you provided us a link, plus an example table schema and 'table structure is changed' would help.
marrowyungSenior Technical architecture (Data)Author Commented:
Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Data DudeCommented:
Do you have a specific situation and question in mind?  'Go read this link and tell me what's not in it' is not an abundantly actionable question.
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marrowyungSenior Technical architecture (Data)Author Commented:
the link has this part:

SQL Server 2005

•Going from a heap to a clustered index: This is the same as SQL Server 2000 – all non-clustered indexes are rebuilt, regardless of whether the clustered index was created online or offline.


•Going from a clustered index to a heap: Again, all non-clustered indexes are rebuilt, regardless of whether the clustered index is dropped online or offline.


•Rebuilding a unique clustered index: This is the same as SQL Server 2000 – the cluster keys aren’t changing and so the non-clustered indexes are not rebuilt.


•Rebuilding a non-unique clustered index: Aha! This is different from SQL Server 2000. SQL Server 2005 will RE-USE the old uniquifier values so the cluster keys don’t change. This means that non-clustered indexes are NOT rebuilt in this case – that’s very cool!


•Changing the clustered index schema:

◦Changing the cluster key: This behavior has to be the same as SQL Server 2000 – any change to the cluster keys forces all the non-clustered indexes to be rebuilt after the new clustered index has been created.


◦Changing anything else (e.g. partitioning it or moving it):This is one of the cases that confuses people in SQL Server 2005. Moving it to a different filegroup doesn’t change the cluster key at all – so there’s no need to rebuild the non-clustered indexes, but applying a partitioning scheme DOES cause the nonclustered indexes to be rebuilt.

so how about the case in SQL server 2008/2012/2014 ? are they behave the same ?
Scott PletcherSenior DBACommented:
Yes.  SQL 2008, 2012 and 2014 index actions are the same as for SQL 2005.  The underlying physical index structure determines when SQL has to rebuild an index(es), and that has not changed for any of those versions.

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marrowyungSenior Technical architecture (Data)Author Commented:
ScottPletcher,

tks for answering my question as I am going to dig into more on application size DBA work and I will keep coming with development style problem which, you might think I don't know what I am asking but I know what I am asking.

please keep answering me and if you think I am too dump and making trouble for you, please send me killer URL/link/resource for me to read so that I can get used to it and quickly understand what you mean.

"The underlying physical index structure determines when SQL has to rebuild an index(es), and that has not changed for any of those versions. "

tks for it.
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