volume os have an unsupported file system and cannot be backed up windows server 2012 r2

I completed migration from sbs 2011 to windows server 2012 r2 essentials.

The user is using the system regularly but are now ready to do scheduled backups.
I am getting the following error during backup setup:

volume os have an unsupported file system and cannot be backed up windows server 2012 r2

When I go to disk management I see 2 partitions OS and the C; drive.
Can I deactivate the OS volume?

In reading, I see if I delete the OS partition, I will not be available to  reboot the system.

I also read that if I run repair it will fix the problem. the server is a dell t320 power server which
was purchased without the OS which I installed.

The system is used 7 days a week.  Can someone help me fix this problem.  Will I need to bring the system?

This is my first 2012 installation.  i will need detailed instructions.  The user is getting impatient.

Thanks so much in advance for your help.

Isaac
TechIsaacIT Contracting Asked:
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
Take a screen shot of Windows Disk Management and post it here.
It can be that file system type of your system partition is FAT which is normally not supported. But you can convert it to NTFS without loosing your data and system. First screen shot.
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Lionel MMSmall Business IT ConsultantCommented:
if you see it in Disk Management it usually says something like "system reserved" or OEM partition or something like that. You DO NOT want to mess with it--it is  used by the OS to install and boot your system. if you did an in-place upgrade it may be left over from the previous OS. I would simply exclude that partition from the backup. Other suggestion is to clone/duplicate the drive and then on the cloned drive see what happens if you try to remove that partition.
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TechIsaacIT Contracting Author Commented:
The partition is FAT32 as you stated. How do I convert the partition? I will have to be on site to
screen shot .

How do I exclude the partition from backup? It is probably left over from Dell before I
installed MS Server 2012 R2 Essentials.

It is imperative that I maintain the data and get the data backed up as soon as possible.
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
You can convert this partition if it has a drive letter. Does it? You did not provide the screenshot from Windows Disk Management.
To convert the FAT partition into NTFS you need to type in command line:
convert x: /fs:ntfs
Where X: is the drive letter for your partition.
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Lionel MMSmall Business IT ConsultantCommented:
If this is an oem or Windows install partition I would be very cautious about converting it. You already have indicated you are not creating backups so if you can ahead and mess with this partition and the server doesn't boot then what will you do then. Depending on what you are using to do your backups there should be options to do custom versus full backups, what are doing your backups with?
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
Give us a screen shot of Windows Disk Management. And you will get a clear suggestion if you should mix with it or not.
I have never had problems after converting Dell EISA partitions which are usually FAT. OEM partition can have some boot environment but is is not a problem.
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Lionel MMSmall Business IT ConsultantCommented:
I must say that it very strange indeed because all I use are Dell products and EVERY TIME I have messed with their install partition the system would not boot, and that goes for both server and PCs; each time I tried to do anything with it my system would not boot. Thus my advice to be very cautious.
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
One should be cautious, that's for sure. But without having a single look on a real layout frightening someone with "awful stories" is not very helpful :)
As said - depending on the fact - for what the partition is used - it can be converted or it cannot be converted.
The file system converting does not delete the data. And even if the partition contains system boot data - it can be converted.
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Lionel MMSmall Business IT ConsultantCommented:
I am not frightening them Noxcho, you are the one who said it is "no problem" if it has a drive letter. All I have been trying to say is to be cautious. Further I did not say "DON'T give us a screenshot" I never said that wasn't a good idea--it is--all I was saying to be cautious while you where saying you can go ahead, and again all I said before proceeding make sure you have a fall back (like a good backup) before proceeding--that is not frightening information, this is Tech 101 common sense.
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
Well, nothing personal, please don't get me wrong but after reading this statement:
If this is an oem or Windows install partition I would be very cautious about converting it. You already have indicated you are not creating backups so if you can ahead and mess with this partition and the server doesn't boot then what will you do then.
I would fear to touch the server at all. Because the logic of the statement says - don't touch it having 0 backups.
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Lionel MMSmall Business IT ConsultantCommented:
nothing personal either but all that says is BEFORE you mess with it make sure you have a fallback option in case it affects your bootup--logic 101, tech support 101, this is beginner stuff. IF means if--my stament says IF this is an OEM....... be careful, have a backup. I learned this in the first week of technology training.
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TechIsaacIT Contracting Author Commented:
The layout is attached.  The actual disk management looks like the attached which I
copied from the internet.  This is exactly as it looks on the client server.

I did copies to another hard drive as backup
howesys.png
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TechIsaacIT Contracting Author Commented:
I am attempting backups with the ms server 2012 r2 essentials backup wizard
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
So this partition contains BootMGR and boot folder.
Do you have an installation DVD of this server?
If yes then I would convert this partition. But first assign it a drive letter (right click on it - change/assign drive letter - assign one available drive letter). Then see what data is there in this partition.
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Lionel MMSmall Business IT ConsultantCommented:
From the picture this seems to be a very normal disk drive setup--what are you using for backup Windows Server backup or 3rd party software; and what type of backup are you trying to do, bare metal, partial, full?
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TechIsaacIT Contracting Author Commented:
I am trying to do a full backup of the c: drive
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TechIsaacIT Contracting Author Commented:
I am trying to setup a backup using windows server backup as installed with the operating system
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Lionel MMSmall Business IT ConsultantCommented:
Well as I see it you have two choices to use some 3rd party software and do a backup of the drive as it is now so you have something to fall back on or two go ahead and convert the drive to NTFS (Acronis is one example--free trial). As noxcho indicates the likelihood of that causing an issue is low, not impossible but low.
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
Don't try to complicate the things which are simple. Assign a drive letter to this partition - check it with chkdsk and then convert it. This operation does not require reboot normally. When finished - take your backup.
Even if you are trying to take backup of C drive Windows Server Backup will try to take backup of this partition. Because it contains boot files of Windows.
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TechIsaacIT Contracting Author Commented:
Thanks for the solutions.

I'm a novice in this area so bare with me.

How do I implement the conversion after drive assignment?
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Lionel MMSmall Business IT ConsultantCommented:
right click on it --if it is possible it should be there; if not you will have to use "diskpart" or you can use the "convert" command https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb490885.aspx
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TechIsaacIT Contracting Author Commented:
I be on site this weekend and will give it a try.
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Toni SwinfieldIT TechnicianCommented:
Choose FAT32 partition, Right click and change drive letter, path and assign letter, I chose I:

Then open command prompt and type this;

convert I:/fs:ntfs

When asked the label its the name of the partition youre changing, mine was called OS so type

OS

Say NO to forcing dismount and YES to after reboot.

Hope for the best!
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