The Drive where windows is installed is locked

Hello,
     I was contacted by a client who couldn't log on to his computer.  We had never set up a logon password.  He doesn't remember setting one up...he is however an senior and computers can be somewhat confusing for him.  Then we tried the only password he knew it could be and it didn't work.
     He had gotten some help from another technician to show him how to attach pictures to an email.  I saw that they had made a remote connection with him, they used ShowMyPCService-Tight VNC.  It appears that soon after that, 9/10/15, he began having issues.  I ask him if he called them or if they had contacted him...he said he called them.
     I tried some things remotely with him but we couldn't log him in and the last time I tried to remotely log on it said "Blocked".  This of course makes me very suspicious as he was not able to log on to his computer to block me and he wouldn't do that anyway.  
     I picked up his computer and was going to use my password removal disc but when going into change the boot order the dvd drive wasn't available as it was in UEFI Mode, which I am not familiar with.  I tried a "Refresh" but without a log on password I couldn't proceed and received the message, "The drive where windows is installed is locked."  I tried another advanced option and when attempting to backup his data it failed.  I found some solutions from using the command prompt to going into HP's Recovery Manager and reinstalling the OS.
     I have pulled his HD and backed up his personal information.  Can I change the UEFI Mode to Legacy BIOS Mode?  What would you recommend I do next?

Thank you,
Mags
MagsOwnerAsked:
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kulboyCommented:
Many computers with UEFI firmware will allow you to enable a legacy BIOS compatibility mode. In this mode, the UEFI firmware functions as a standard BIOS instead of UEFI firmware. This can help improve compatibility with older operating systems that weren’t designed with UEFI in mind — Windows 7, for example.

If your PC has this option, you’ll find it in the UEFI settings screen. You should only enable this if necessary.
MagsOwnerAuthor Commented:
Hi Kulboy,
     Where is the UEFI settings screen.  You say to only enable this if necessary...what other choice do I have?
Thanks,
Mags
KimputerCommented:
Search through the whole BIOS if possible. If really nothing is mentioned, look for the words Legacy or CSM mode (requires Secureboot to be off)

If you really still can't find it, the other way is to have the disk in another PC (one you know where it will boot properly from the CD or USB). To avoid confusion, always have only that disk in the PC before continuing, so you won't make any mistakes.
As the password reset boot cd/dvd doesn't need to be started from that computer, but it can be from any computer.

Also, I still doubt that he called them. Sounds like he is confused. To check, you should ask him how he contacted them and how he found their information (phone number? web site? etc). If he can't give you this info, he's mistaken and he was called first (and then you should do a full virus scan sweep of the disk as well, again with boot usb/dvd)
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kulboyCommented:
what machine do you have?  if you let me know, i can assist in finding it.
MagsOwnerAuthor Commented:
HP Pavilion P7-1534...attempting a password reset.
kulboyCommented:
The F10 key should take the system directly to BIOS when pressing F10 about once a second after turning it on.  I understand this is not the case here.  The ESC key should take you to a startup menu where you can select various options.  What happens when you try to get into BIOS?  Does the same thing happen when using the ESC key instead?
MagsOwnerAuthor Commented:
Okay...my choice are

Diagnostics F2
Boot Menu F9
Computer Setup F10
System Recovery F11
Network Boot F12
Utilities
Run UEFI Application

Where to?
MagsOwnerAuthor Commented:
Went into F10 and went into boot order there...selected USB dvd drive...I'll keep you posted.
MagsOwnerAuthor Commented:
USB Floppy is not working shall I enable Legacy boot sources?
MagsOwnerAuthor Commented:
Since I am fearing that it is infected (again) I am considering simply doing a clean install if possible through the HP Recovery Manager, especially since I have his personal files and folders...thoughts.
Thanks,
Mags
MagsOwnerAuthor Commented:
While waiting, and working on other computers, I decided to run some diagnostic tests....hard drive short dst check failed.  hmmm running other tests...no sense in doing a bunch of work on the computer is the HD is failing.
MagsOwnerAuthor Commented:
Processor - passed, Memory - passed, HD diagnostics - failed.  Heading out to get a new HD.

I would still appreciate more information on Legacy options had I not seen HD failure.

Comment 2015-09-17 at 14:06:22ID: 40982610
USB Floppy is not working shall I enable Legacy boot sources?

Thank you,
Mags
MagsOwnerAuthor Commented:
opps, I forgot...I still need to boot from the dvd drive...please help.
MagsOwnerAuthor Commented:
Never mind...after replacing the HD the ATAPI CD/DVD was available...reinstalling now.

I would still appreciate more information on Legacy options had I not seen HD failure.

Comment 2015-09-17 at 14:06:22ID: 40982610
USB Floppy is not working shall I enable Legacy boot sources?
Thanks,
Mags
kulboyCommented:
BIOS boots by reading the first sector on a hard disk and executing it; this boot sector in turn locates and runs additional code. The BIOS system is very limiting because of space constraints and because BIOS runs 16-bit code, whereas modern computers use 32-bit or 64-bit CPUs. By contrast, EFI (or UEFI, which is just EFI 2.x) boots by loading EFI program files (with .efi filename extensions) from a partition on the hard disk, known as the EFI System Partition (ESP). These EFI boot loader programs can take advantage of EFI boot services for things like reading files from the hard disk.

As a practical matter, if you're using an OS like Linux that has complex BIOS-mode boot loaders, EFI-mode booting is likely to be similar to BIOS-mode booting, since GRUB 2 (the most popular BIOS-mode boot loader for Linux) has been ported to work under EFI, and many Linux distributions install GRUB 2 by default on EFI systems. OTOH, you can replace or supplement GRUB 2 with other EFI boot loaders. Indeed, the Linux kernel itself can be an EFI boot loader; code was added to do this with the 3.3.0 kernel. Used in this way, the EFI itself loads and runs the Linux kernel, or you can use a third-party boot manager like rEFInd or gummiboot to let you select which OS or kernel to boot.

How would I know that I'm booting with UEFI not with BIOS?
There are clues in the firmware's user interface; however, those are unreliable and vary from one computer to another. The only way to be sure is to check to see how the computer booted. In Linux, for instance, the presence of a directory called /sys/firmware/efi is diagnostic. If it's present, you've booted in EFI mode; if it's not present, you've probably booted in BIOS mode. (This directory can be absent on an EFI-mode boot under some circumstances, though.) dmesg output that refers to EFI is also diagnostic of an EFI-mode boot. In Windows, the partition table of the boot disk is diagnostic; if it's GPT, you booted in EFI mode, and if it's MBR, you booted in BIOS mode.

So what is the real different in the "boot with BIOS" and "boot with UEFI"?
EFI can be faster, but that's not certain. The biggest speed difference is in hardware initialization early in the process. On my systems, this is a fraction of the total boot time, so a reduction in the hardware initialization time, while good, doesn't make all that much difference. It's not like I'm rebooting every ten minutes, after all.

UEFI supports a feature called Secure Boot that's intended, as the name suggests, to improve security. It does this by requiring a digital "signature" of boot loaders, which in turn should require signing of kernels, and so on up the chain. This should make it harder for malware authors to insert their code into the pre-boot process, thus improving security. This sounds good, but it also complicates dual-boot configurations, since code like GRUB and the Linux kernel must be signed. The major Linux distribution vendors are working on ways to make these requirements less of a burden for average Linux users, and they've got some preliminary stuff ready. At the moment, though, disabling Secure Boot is the easiest way to deal with it. This is a practical concern mainly for brand-new computers that ship with Windows 8, since Microsoft is requiring Secure Boot be enabled to get Windows 8 certification. Some people confuse UEFI and Secure Boot (the latter is just one feature of the former), but it deserves mention as a difference between BIOS and UEFI because it's causing some problems for new Windows 8 computers. If you've got an older system or are comfortable enough with firmware setup utilities to disable Secure Boot, this need not be a real problem.

Microsoft ties the boot disk's partition table type to the firmware type (MBR to BIOS; GPT to UEFI). Because MBR tops out at 2TiB (assuming standard sector sizes), this means that UEFI is a practical necessity to boot Windows on over-2TiB disks. You can still use such big disks as data disks under Windows, though, and you can boot some non-Microsoft OSes (such as Linux and FreeBSD) on big disks using GPT under BIOS.

As a practical matter if you're concerned about or interested in UEFI, the biggest issue is simply that UEFI is new enough that support for it is a bit spotty, particularly in some older and more exotic OSes. UEFI itself is new enough that most of its implementations are buggy, and those that aren't vary enough amongst themselves that it can be hard to describe things generally. Thus, using UEFI can be a challenge. OTOH, UEFI is the future. It's got some modest advantages, some of which will become more important in time (such as the 2TiB boot disk limit of Windows). Switching to a UEFI boot will change a few details of the boot process, but your overall computing experience won't change all that much once you overcome any boot issues you may encounter.

some good reading here:
http://www.howtogeek.com/175649/what-you-need-to-know-about-using-uefi-instead-of-the-bios/

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nobusCommented:
can you test the usb floppy on another system mags?
>>  shall I enable Legacy boot sources?  <<  only if you want to boot from it
check all usb settings -  what do they show? -->  you can also post a picture of the UEFI screen
MagsOwnerAuthor Commented:
Replaced the HD and reinstalled OS, updates, common software and personal data/programs.
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