What are the options to most efficiently install Windows 10?

Hi all,

Case:
I have a PC with a working Windows 10 Home installatie, upgraded from a Windows 7 Home Premium OS. The harddisk crashed today, so I replaced it with a new HDD and thought: Windows 10 already was installed and activated before so I must be able to install Windows 10 Home from a CD (made with the MS creation tool). During installation it asked for the product key so I typed the Windows 7 Home Premium key from the license sticker. It told me : the key doesn't work. I thought: the setup is not able to check if the 7 key is valid for use in 10 since the setup cannot communicate with the Internet / MS Activation server. So I skipped the key input and continued the installation. When in Windows you can change the product key, so I did (with a working Internet connection): error: the product key is not valid, error: 0xc004f050.

Question:
Is there a way to directly install Windows 10 on a system which already had Windows 10 before (upgraded from 7 / 8 / 8.1) OR worst case scenario: you always need to install the original OS, then update the old OS completely and then: upgrade to 10.

If it is: install original OS / update / upgrade then Windows 10 will be the most time consuming MS OS installation EVER.

Also: I would expect a website from Microsoft where you just input the key of Windows 7 / 8 / 8.1 and it tells: already Windows 10 approved OR it generates the Windows 10 key.

Anyone any idea on how to most efficiently do a Windows 10 installation without installing the prior OS?

Thank you
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAsked:
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
If you upgrade to Windows 10, there is a way to save a backup so that you can install Windows 10 directly onto a new hard drive.

If you have not done this (I have not done this myself yet). then you need to install the base operating system on the hard drive and upgrade it to Windows 10  (Windows 7 SP1 or Windows 8.1 are the base operating systems).
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Also you can purchase Windows 10 and install it fresh, but that is not what you are looking for here.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
I am stunned!!

You would expect that Microsoft is able to verify a Windows 7 key as valid for Windows 10 and then just hit the activate button. Wow! Really worst case scenario. I am a systems administrator with 300 clients who all together have hundreds of computers and now I must spend time making those Windows 10 reinstall backups and also keep those DVD's safe somewhere. I cannot trust and expect a client to do this, you'll always see that they will lose it or damage it and so on. We also have a certain reinstallation pricing which will go up if we have to install base OS and then upgrade.

Example:

Installation Windows 7 SP1 : 20 minutes
Installation SP2: 15 minutes
Installatien 190 updates after SP2 including download: 45 to 180 minutes (some systems are really slow I noticed)
Waiting for Windows 10 icon to come alive (not always directly after the last update): xx minutes
Upgrade to Windows 10: 15 to 45 minutes

Again: I am stunned
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
It is like this because it was "free". So you either have to have already created the proper backup, or start again with the base operating system.  The key is kept at Microsoft and allows a base install but it had to be backed up first.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi John,

got it! Thank you.

Still I don't understand the reason for not making this more efficient, free or not, why make it hard to use for their customer. A DOS installation from 3 floppy's is 10 minutes. Not making progress here.

Anyhow: thank you!

Perhaps a tip how to backup it back to a DVD as an installation?
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
I cannot answer why Microsoft did it the way they did, but I know you have to create the backup first.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Do you know how or where to do that?
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
I cannot answer why Microsoft did it the way they did, but I know you have to create the backup first. when one upgrades the operating system the product key equivalent is stored in the microsoftstore with the machine information hash.
When one reinstalls the operating system you don't enter a product key (it will ask for it twice but it will query the microsoftstore and compare the current system hash with a stored hash and if there is a match the o/s is activated. So effectively there is NO product key in this scenario
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Here is a guide for making a Windows 10 backup from a working system.

http://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-create-a-system-image-in-windows-10/


I had used Symantec Ghost for this and Symantec has created Symantec System Recovery for Windows 8.1 and I am waiting for the next service pack (due before the end of this year) to make a complete backup of my Windows 10 system on a USB hard drive
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
So we'll need to offer our clients the option of imaging as well.

Thank you,

Completely unhappy with Microsoft in this case, but completely happy with your fast and clear response.

Thank you John.
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Thanks. I would like it to be better myself. That is why I am going use the Symantec application.
Cliff GaliherCommented:
Read David Johnson's answer. John is incorrect in this case, whereas David provided you the right answer. There is (usually) an easy to reinstall once you've done an upgrade once, and it doesn't require an imaging solution
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi Cliff,

David's reaction does not give the solution on how to do that. Perhaps if indeed possible you can tell me how to do it more easy.
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
use the windows media creator and create an iso or usb media.. you can now wipe the drive and clean install from the media.. do not enter a product key.. it allows you to skip, it will ask you once more during the out of box experience. skip for now.  You will look and find out that the machine is activated.
http://winsupersite.com/windows-10/windows-10-clean-install-using-media-creation-tool#slide-0-field_images-57241
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
I have used the Media Creator tool myself to install Windows 10 and I know it works. But the text supplied by Microsoft is pretty clear that you need to start with a working operating system (Windows 7, 8 or 10). That is why I assumed you must make a Windows 10 backup in order to install on a fresh hard drive.
akahanCommented:
John, you need a working copy of Windows 10 to CREATE an image using the media creator, not to USE the image once created.

If you have previously activated Windows 10 on your machine, and you're doing a clean installation (for example because you've replaced the hard drive), you can download Windows 10 for free from Microsoft using the Windows 10 media creator tool and install Windows 10 on your new drive from the bootable USB image created by the tool.  When you get to the screen that asks you for your key, you just press "skip" in the lower right hand corner of the screen, as David previously mentioned.

Since the machine was previously registered with Windows 10, the installation will phone home to Microsoft to verify this, and then continue merrily on its way.
Cliff GaliherCommented:
You must upgrade *once* from a legal activated OS to take advantage of the free upgrade. You can then wipe and reinstall often without going through then upgrade process. Your free upgrade license is stored in the Microsoft cloud so it knows it was done legally. It will reactivate even after a "clean" reinstall.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi David,

in the link you supplied I can only see upgrade scenario's. I want to do a Windows 10 installation on a new harddrive immediately.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi Akahan,

So what you say is: install Windows 10 from CD or USB on a new harddrive and skip activation, once in Windows it will contact and activate once again?

If so and looking at the comment of David about the hardware hash: isn't the problem then that I have replaced the HDD which creates a different hash, therefor not being able to activate once again from a clean direct Windows 10 installation?
Cliff GaliherCommented:
1) Use the media creation tool to make a USB.
2) boot from USB and go through the install.
3) SKIP all product key requests. Don't try to use your win7 key. Just skip 'em.

It's really that easy.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi Cliff,

I am going to test that RIGHT NOW, I will let you all know within 45 minutes. One thing: new HDD makes new HASH therefor the MS Store may think it is not the same system?
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
you need (a) to have upgraded on that machine once -- which you have done
you need bootable media using the media creation tool.
you then boot from the bootable media.. you may have replaced the hard drive or from the setup screen hit either shift-f10 or just f10 to open a command prompt.. and if there is nothing on the drive you wish to keep enter
diskpart'
list disk
select disk x   where x is the number of the disk from list disk
clean                this will wipe the drive
exit                   this exits diskpart
exit                   exits the command prompt
install to the now empty disk ignoring any product key prompts
your now done.
Cliff GaliherCommented:
Activation based on hardware hash has been around since XP. The only this g changing here is that the hash is now in the cloud.

Replace a bard drive? Usually not an issue. Replace a hard drive, NIC, and upgrade ram all at once? That'd trigger re-activation.

Usually the only single component that'll cause issues is replacing a motherboard.
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
you need to change 3 components  i.e. hard drive, motherboard, video card before you have to reactivate a new hard drive is only 1 item  .. this is the standard rules for reactivation with changed hardware.
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
John, you need a working copy of Windows 10 to CREATE an image using the media creator, not to USE the image once created. more wrong information.. you can use any operating system that will execute the executable  vista/7/8/8.1/10/s2K8/S2K8R2/S2K12/S2K12R2 it doesn't matter.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
David / Cliff,

do you also think that the hash is updated during use of the machine with Windows 10, I mean: upgrading RAM, new videocard, additional HDD. Windows will keep working but reinstalling after a while will perhaps trigger a change (or not if changes are updated).

By the way: reinstalling right now.
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
I copied that text from the media creation tool website.  So if the text is incorrect, it is a Microsoft error.

I understood the part about SKIP and waiting for the answer to see if that worked.
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
What is so frig**** difficult with this concept.. it is frightfully EASY.. If you've activated windows 10 on this machine you can reinstall as many times as you want. you don't even have to enter a product key anymore.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi David,

not difficult, only thing is that it isn't clear to begin with, why not state it during installation, a simple line like: if you already activated before from a previous version you can skip the key input and continue. Also: when I did this before (skipping) and did a properties on my computer, I could not see that there was an active Windows (perhaps it takes a few hours or even days?
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
I understand.. that it is not plainly pointed out. I was a preview person and the o/s had already updated to retail and it kept failing to update so I downloaded the media and wiped the disk and clean installed.. and hit the product key prompts (since I didn't have one I selected skip and later on skip for now. eventually msdn published product keys.. so I went into activation and it was already activated (I was prepared to use a MSDN key)
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Ok, installed Windows 10 Home from DVD skipping key input. The status now is (I have a Dutch Windows, I will try to translate):

Edition: Windows 10 Home
Activation: Windows is not activated

This product code (have not given one) does not work. You perhaps need to contact MS / Supplier or buy one.

Error: 0xC004C003

Currect product code: *****-8HVX7 (don't know where that is coming from)

I am going to try to hit the activate button now.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
O, wait, there is no activate button, only:

Change product key
and
Go to Store

Change product key is no option
Go to Store gives me: 135 euro's to buy or upgrade to pro AND

I already have a Windows 10 product key
But, hitting that link gives me the key input screen.

Going to reboot now
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
try
 slmgr.vbs -ato

Open in new window

from an elevated command prompt
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Ok, Interesting, after a reboot I can see this:

BEFORE:
Edition: Windows 10 Home
Activation: Windows is not activated

NOW:
Edition: Windows 10 Home
Activation: Connecting to Internet to activate Windows

now...

After refreshing this screen it tells me once again:

Edition: Windows 10 Home
Activation: Windows is not activated

SO: it actually did an online check, but cannot activate since (as it shows): this product key does not work...
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
I did that David,

nothing happens / changes
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Tried it again, at every reboot it connects to Internet trying to activate.

Please everyone if you like, read this (also see hardware changes on the bottom):
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-10/why-activate-windows-10

To test it correctly I need tot do this on a previously activated machine and then do a clean reinstall WITHOUT hardware change, that is the only way to confirm if it is possible.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Now I can see this (changed nothing, only rebooted):
EE
Very interesting article here of people who tried it over and over and contacted Microsoft:
http://www.tenforums.com/windows-updates-activation/10125-win-10-activation-failed-error-code-0xc004c003-2.html?s=7416efcecd483ac61227fb9c98786f56

Microsoft apparantly said: "You can never do clean installs, only upgrades"
Cliff GaliherCommented:
First, are you installing from media created from the media creation tool? Other media won't work properly. Second, did you have win10 activated propler after an upgrade, before swapping out the hard drive? That initial upgrade is what stores the hardware hash in the cloud. If you never upgraded and activated, it never got stored, so "reactivation" will fail...as it is not RE-activating anything. And finally, did you *only* change the hard drive? As I explained above, that matters.

I've done this since release dozens of times as user group presentations, online demos, and conference classes. It does work. It's been tested and documented, but Microsoft still wants to curb piracy, so it doesn't allow activation willy-nilly. They built a system that verifies the machine was legally entitled to the upgrade. So you do have to abide those structural rules.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
I think that this one is correct and will test it tomorrow:

Windows 10 couldn't care less what your key was on some old legacy OS. Your install is activated (theoretically and normally) by a record of your hardware stored on MS servers.

You need to upgrade from a valid version of Windows 7 or 8 and this will register your PC. If you clean install without doing this it will not work. If you change your hardware too much it will not work. If you enter a key it will not work.

If you have previously upgraded and you got an activated Windows 10 and then you get this message then call them.

To be clear, normally if you are on an old version of Windows:

You must upgrade first (not clean install) so MS can register your hardware. Check your Windows 10 is activated when you have.
You must not ever enter your old key or any other key ever unless you have actually bought or obtained a Windows 10 one. Ever. Neither on your initial upgrade or on a subsequent clean install.
If you clean install it must be the same PC (same hardware) and the same version (Home, Pro) and you must already be activated on that device on Windows 10.
If it still doesn't activate call them (but be prepared to be on hold for a long time and perhaps to call several times).
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Ok, Cliff.

I have done it all correctly, only thing: swapped the HDD after using the activated Windows 10 for 2 weeks, then my original disk died.
JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Dear ElisysAutomatisering - According to others here, I have provided you with the wrong information and have accordingly unaccepted my answer. I have unsubscribed from this question in order to allow others to help you.
nobusCommented:
my experience also was it would not activate from a fresh  install
i'm following this with interest
noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
The idea that it will activate automatically is just a theory. In practice you get it automatically activated only if you perform direct upgrade.
From fresh install the change key option usage is required.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
I am testing it right now. The most annoying thing are the 190 updates following SP1 on Windows 7, it takes up to 1,5 - 2 hours with searching / downloading / installing.

If clean install turns out not to be possible then a Windows 10 installation from Windows 7 will take up to 4 or 5 hours, completely insane.
nobusCommented:
why care about updates? stop them and go to windows10 from there
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi Nobus,

not thought about that, but is that even possible? Also a thing for our testcase. I will let you know.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi Nobus,

I think you forget 1 thing. A clean install was not able to activate because I changed the HDD, since the original one was defect. I need a new approval of Microsoft to install 10. So when I upgrade now it will see that the hardware is still different then before and not activate. I need to update Windows 7 in full and then need a taskbar confirmation to upgrade, only then the new hash will be created I was guessing.

The Windows 10 installation however did start to run even though I had no fully updated my Windows 7 (missed 100 updates of 190 in total). Do have SP1.
nobusCommented:
>>   I need to update Windows 7 in full and then need a taskbar confirmation   <<  no; you can install it from cd; but of course, you need the key -but that has nothing to do with either win7 or win 10 install
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-10/media-creation-tool-install
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi Nobus,

I don't understand, I have no key (only 7, no 10). I know I can install from CD, but the hardware has changed.

My question is : at what point does Microsoft realize that the hardware has changed, but it is still the same PC, so therefor needs to create a new hardware hash.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Windows 7 is now fully up to date, but no Windows 10 icon appears or in updates no 10 download feature appears.

I am running the Microsoft Windows 10 readyness tool. Tells me I am missing update KB948721. The tool installs it for me.

Still after reboots no upgrade icon. I don't want to risk an update to 10 from DVD since the previous 10 activation was on a different HDD therefor a different hardware setting. I think I need a new upgrade approval.
akahanCommented:
Changing the hard drive makes NO difference to Windows 10's activation process.   And, if you are using a machine with UEFI, you can change just about everything on the hardware, except the motherboard, and your changes will have no effect on registration.
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
the media creation tool creates a generic windows 10 installation.iso/usb drive
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi Akahan,

no, Microsoft themselves say so:

See hardware changes on the bottom:
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-10/why-activate-windows-10
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
have you even tried activate by phone?
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
No, because I didn't see that option. I know it from XP, used it many times. Perhaps I have to wait a few hours, my Windows 7 is now freshly installed and all up to date. Readyness tool confirms everything is Windows 10 ready. No update icon yet.

Please keep in mind that the HDD has changed, that is very important in this case.
Cliff GaliherCommented:
You can run the upgrade from CD/DVD/USB. The task bar upgrade tool just does a readiness check and downloads windows 10 to the hard drive for later installation. It does not verify if win7 is legal and it does not activate your win10 install. It has nothing to do with activation whatsoever.. The upgrade program itself (which is the same code/executable on a CD/USB as it is if downloaded by the reservation update) is what checks if win7 is activated and activates windows 10. So there is no difference running it from media or running it from your hard drive, which is what the task bar icon triggers. You can skip it.
noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
My question is : at what point does Microsoft realize that the hardware has changed, but it is still the same PC, so therefor needs to create a new hardware hash.
If I remember it correctly the hardware change is considered to be a move to new hardware (like moving HDD to new PC) after 10 hardware changes.
Microsoft controls the installation and remove of non generic hardware. And single HDD replacement must not disable your activation.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Ok Cliff,

gonna update to Windows 10 right now, from DVD.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Very weird once again, now I am getting that upgrade icon in the taskbar telling me to make the reservation and wait a few hours / days / weeks to expect the upgrade confirmation.

So I have to apply again apperantly, perhaps due to the HDD change. Why else getting this icon again.

Anyway, I am not going to wait and are upgrade from DVD right now.

All very confusing...
akahanCommented:
Microsoft is incorrect.  Changing your hard drive, alone, will not make any difference for Windows 10 activation.  That language is left over from instructions on prior versions of Windows.

I realize there's no reason you should believe me rather than Microsoft; but that's the case.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
FINALLY!

After upgrading to Windows 10 from DVD and waiting for an hour it tells me: Windows is activated!

Offcourse Microsoft would not be Microsoft it there wasn't a problem left. Clicking on start menu and then settings: quick flash of the screen and nothing happens, no settings / control panel pane.

Holy $@#%@#$%

Now what? Reinstall everything???

Back to my Atari 2600?
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Not being able to open start - settings OR on the desktop right mouse - properties is apparently a bug, can be solved with this MS tool: http://aka.ms/diag_settings

So: it works now, but I will leave this question open, because I am going to test this on different machines and give a total final conclusion on this subject.
☠ MASQ ☠Commented:
Wow, there is a whole load of partially correct info here that needs putting into some kind of order.

Firstly the Win 7/8 to Win 10 upgrade

If you've a qualifying system you don't need to wait for the GWX icon to pop-up if you are sure your system is compatible.  GWX is simply an upgrade that gets the Readiness checker running and downloads the Win 10 upgrade in the background for you.

You can upgrade by using the file created by the Media Creation Tool at any point by running Setup.exe from within the Win 7/8 OS

If you don't need to keep any data then tell the Upgrade Wizard, it's a whole lot faster and you miss most of the pain.

When you upgrade Win 10 setup ignores any activation status (but interestingly does record it) you just need the qualifying base system.  As part of the activation process it takes a hardware "fingerprint" of key components.  Future activation then relies on that hardware combination (including BIOS and CPU serials) being present.  A clean install using the same installation media will take the same hardware hash and compare it with Microsoft's activation records for automatic activation.

If you are prompted for an activation key on a system that's already fingerprinted DON'T enter one it's then stored in a temp file on the HDD during the installation process.  The Install Wizard  looks for this in preference to the stored "fingerprint" on the activation servers and from that point onward until the temp file is removed it assumes this isn't a previously activated system and that an incorrect activation key has been used.

Changing hardware like on previous versions of Windows can prompt reactivation based on a component weighting system.  If Activation is attempted on a considerably altered set up online activation fails and like earlier versions you are pushed to explain your changes to Microsoft on a free phone line.  Motherboard changes automatically invalidate activation from fingerprint even if the base system upgraded from was a FPP/Retail package   Microsoft justify this as the upgrade was "free" - this will need testing once the one year free upgrade is over and more users get into this mess if Microsoft don't make it more transparent.  HDD changes are "expected" and shouldn't prompt reactivation on their own.

So the biggest "Gotchas" at the moment are it's not clear that you need to do the clean install with
a) The same media you used to create the upgrade (so make a copy in case Microsoft upgrade this)
b) Without an Activation Key - because - unless you had an Insider Programme copy - you never had one.

Oh and another thing - Microsoft's activation servers for reactivation processes are rather busy right now as most of the World is playing with 10 - so don't expect instant re-activation!

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AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi MASQ,

very clear and complete comment. I will get back on this, going to test a few things, but I totally understand what you are saying, somewhat a relief I must say.
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
I created a video that shows this exactly.
For John's information I used Windows Server 2012R2 to create the media.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aD4EQJnC0iU&feature=youtu.be
https://vimeo.com/140614597
nobusCommented:
just to answer your previous Q about stopping the updates :
go to windows updates, and set it to NEVER update - that stops it.
what i meant with the key code is simply: either in win7 or 10 it will need a valid code
so if you don't supply it in the W7 install, it will ask for it in the other one

**what made it work the last time, you think?
LeeTutorretiredCommented:
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

Not enough information to confirm an answer.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi LeeTutor,

don't close, it is a pending issue which is under investigation. All comments are being tested.
noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
The author wrote: Hi LeeTutor,

don't close, it is a pending issue which is under investigation. All comments are being tested.
LeeTutorretiredCommented:
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

Not enough information to confirm an answer.
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi LeeTutor,

I was sick and offline for months. I forgot about this, but do have the closing answer now. I will post it and award points if I have the rights.

Thank you,

Kind regards,

Erwin
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi LeeTutor,

I was sick and offline for months. I forgot about this, but do have the closing answer now. I will post it and award points if I have the rights.

Thank you,

Kind regards,

Erwin
nobusCommented:
i'm curious for the outcome
AgrippaSenior IT ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Hi all,

thank you all for the input.

I have upgraded and freshly installed hundreds of Windows 10 systems now.

As soon as Windows 7 or Windows 8 is installed and activated you can immediately upgrade to 10 through Windows updates OR as I do it myself: with a USB stick created with the Windows 10 media creation tool. I indeed noticed that expected hardware changes like changing a harddrive does not deactivate the license, it will keep on working. Fresh installs can be made on a system after 1 succesfull upgrade has been made. Check activation status before doing a future fresh install. Als I found out that Windows 10 is way more compatible with hardware changes. I used 1 image on I think about 10 different systems even from a different brand and I just finds a way to install the hardware most of the time. In Windows 7 and al versions before you would get a BSOD like 0x0000007b. So less HAL problems with 10. When you upgrade from 7 to 10 it will maintaint the MBR system instead of GPT.
Do not forget to (on previously Windows 7 installed systems) set the boot option to UEFI when freshly installing Windows 10.

That's about it. Very easy and very fast, try installing from a USB 3.0 or 3.1 created Microsoft 10 install tool offcourse from a USB 3.0 or 3.1 port.

Thank you all!

Kind regards, Erwin
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