windows desktop

when a users logs to  his windows 7 64 bit through VDI , any changes he does reverts back.

his c drive space is getting full. he cleans drive but when he logs to VDI  back again c drive shows almost full again.

Also he tried to  delete all the shorcuts and files on his desktop 
to free up space
but when he restart vdi they come  back


anything I should do should do
pramod1Asked:
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Brian MurphyIT ArchitectCommented:
VDI on what?  Hyper-V, ESX, Xenserver?

Windows OS using VMWare Workstation, Oracle Box?

If VMWare ESXi, what version?  How as the VDI instance allocated from storage perspective?

Citrix XenDesktop VDI?  

Using MCS or PVS?

What version?
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jhyieslaCommented:
It depends on how it was set up, but I suspect the following as it's what we do in our environment. We're running VMware View. Most of our desktops are linked clones and we have them set to refresh on logout.

So, a linked clone is really a snapshot file of a replica. The replica was made from the master and has the base image in it.  Then linked clones are created, each being really a snapshot file. When the user logs on, he is presented with what the person who created the master wanted him to see.  Typically there's not a lot of free space because these aren't meant to be "owned" by any one particular user.  When our users log off the desktop is refreshed which basically means that the snapshot is deleted  - which would explain why everything seems to revert back to the same thing - and then a new snapshot is created so the next time someone logs on, they get the base image again.

What can be done, which may or may not be being done in your situation, is that IT can activate something called Persona Management - there are there third party solutions and if you're using something other than View, I'm not sure what it's called.  But basically this is a roaming profile.  So anything that a user does to HIS desktop or HIS documents folder is captured and the next time he logs onto a generic desktop, he'll get his stuff back again.  Things done to the "C:" drive or the Public desktop are NOT captured.

This could also be why deleting shortcuts don't seem to work.  Or the shortcuts could be being populated by a GPO so every time the user gets a new desktop the shortcuts reappear.

The only way that this can be fixed is if the IT person in charge of it changes it.  In the View world, if a user has a need for a desktop that is always theirs that they can make pretty much any change that IT allows, IT needs  to create a Persistent desktop. In this scenario, there is no snapshot involved, but instead a full desktop is built and when that user logs onto that desktop View makes it his and every time he logs into that pool, he'll get that same desktop.
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Tony JLead Technical ArchitectCommented:
Chances are it's simply how the gold image was created.

At it's simplest, VDI images are non persistent - they get spun up and a user connects. When the user logs off, the image is effectively destroyed and reverts back to whatever is on the gold image.

There are two possible options in this scenario - check the gold image out and remove the files (but this strongly assumes no one else requires them), or expand the virtual disk so there's more space available.

Or provide this one user a private, persistent image but this potentially becomes a management nightmare.

If there's enough space, just expand the disk would probably be the safer option.

There are other ways around it, but I'm going for the simplest choices.
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